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Marilynn Gelfman Karp Collection of Ephemera PR 279

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
New York, NY 10024
(212) 873-3400


New-York Historical Society

Collection processed by Margaret L. Donabedian, December, 2009. Revised to reflect additions, June, 2011 and June 2014.

This finding aid was produced using ArchivesSpace on January 07, 2020 using Describing Archives: A Content Standard

Descriptive Summary

Title: Marilynn Gelfman Karp Collection of Ephemera
Dates [inclusive]: 1842-1985
Dates [bulk]: 1870-1955
Abstract: Ephemera materials spanning the late 19th to mid 20th centuries, including trade cards, blotters, cigarette silks, product and dry good labels, greeting cards, postcards, and hairnet packages, among others.
Quantity: 6.25 Linear feet
Call Phrase: PR 279

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Biographical Notes

Marilynn Gelfman Karp:

Marilynn Gelfman Karp was born in the Bronx, New York, in 1939. Her penchant for collecting began early in childhood, with the careful culling of objects from her everyday life, including things that came in the family mail (greeting cards, attractive postcards, circulars), from family life (milk bottle lids, cigar bands, cigar boxes, campaign buttons, advertising giveaways), things that were found in the street (odd bits of metal, rocks, phenomena with power), gleaned from the grocery store (wooden cheese boxes, fruit crate labels), purchased from or found around the local candy store (bubblegum cards, Dixie lids, soda bottle tops), or from Woolworth's (Jack O'Lanterns, marbles, dexterity games, skate keys), or things from the luncheonette (sugar packets, soda fountain cut-outs). Relatives occasionally gave her relevant objects (foreign coins from service in World War II, pipe tobacco tins, cocktail mixers, figural matches, license plate key chain tags). As she grew up, Karp spent her allowance on things that were important to her (Indian bubblegum cards, trading cards, Cracker Jacks for the prizes, cockamamies, radio premium rings and decoders) and packaging that was compelling (hairnet envelopes, decals).

A deep fascination and perceptive appreciation for the beauty and meaning in everyday objects has characterized her collecting ever since. Karp's passion for collecting is equally shared with her husband, contemporary art dealer Ivan C. Karp, who has been an integral appreciator and inspiration for Karp in the formation of her over 200 well-managed and archivally kept collections of ephemera. Stopping at every flea market, antique show, antique shop, collectibles show, and yard sale that looks interesting to her, she describes these venues as having one thing in common: "they are places of unconditional seeking and possessing. Each object has a story to tell, somewhat fleshing out a time."

Collecting on instinct, each object that Karp has chosen to own is recognized by her as "a material incident in which time and place coalesce in a palpably pungent way." Scanning the past, she considers the objects she encounters in their "much diminished range from when they were new," trying to prevent the "irreversible elimination" of what she feels are "significant and resounding things that inform us about the times in which they were made."

Karp's collecting activities have been additionally informed by her educational background and professional accomplishments in the visual arts. Receiving both a B.F.A. in Studio Art (1958) and an M.A. in Art History (1962) from Hunter College, she then went on to earn a Ph.D. in Physics and Aesthetics from New York University (1965), where she served as a Professor of Art at NYU's Steinhardt School, Department of Art and Art Professions for 42 years. Initially teaching basic 3D design and art history in Western culture, Karp's teaching activities later gravitated toward American art and architecture in the context of cultural history. In this capacity, she was actively involved with M.A. and M.F.A. graduating exhibition classes, and as an advisor, reader, and chair, for many doctoral dissertation committees in art, critical studies, and material culture.

During her years as a professor at NYU, Karp made important and far-reaching contributions to the study of material culture within the University's curriculum, designing and instituting the country's first Master's degree in Visual Arts Administration and Collecting, an M.A. Program in Folk Art (NYU in collaboration with the American Folk Art Museum, NY) and an M.A. program in Costume Studies (NYU in collaboration with the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute).

Beyond her successful career in academia, Karp is a professional sculptor of international achievement, and is an American Academy of Arts and Letters Sculptor's Award recipient. Her collecting interests have helped to shape her creative work, which utilizes a variety of mixed media and found objects. Additionally, she has served as a Trustee and Board Member for a number of organizations devoted to historic preservation and art in public spaces, including the Preservation League of New York State, The Public Art Fund, and the Anonymous Arts Recovery Society.

In 2006, Karp chronicled her adventures in collecting with the publicationIn Flagrante Collecto, published by Harry N. Abrams, which celebrates the odd, arcane, quotidian collectible, as both an object of desire and of cultural anthropology. With the donation of this collection of ephemera to the New-York Historical Society, it is her belief and hope that the public-at-large will be afforded an important brush with material culture, and that museums in general will continue to preserve and serve up these objects to future audiences who will see them with the perspective and clarity that distance affords.

Ivan Karp and OK Harris:

Ivan Karp was an art dealer, author, and American gallerist. Karp was considerably involved in the Photo Realist movement in 1969. He was co-director at the Leo Castelli Gallery between 1959 – 1969, during which time he was instrumental in launching the careers of many renowned pop artists, most notably Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg, Tom Wesselmann and John Chamberlain. In 1969 Karp decided to launch his own gallery, OK Harris, which was located on 465 West Broadway and survived from 1969 until June 2014. The establishment of OK Harris as the first gallery on West Broadway made a significant contribution to the development of the SoHo area's fine arts character. OK Harris exhibited contemporary art and photography, and on occasion mounted shows of antiques and collectibles. The gallery's aim was to show significant artwork without prejudice as to the style or materials employed, the sole criteria was innovation of concept and maturity of technique. Karp died on June 28, 2012 at the age of 86, in New York. OK Harris closed its doors in June 2014.

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Scope and Content Notes

The Marilynn Gelfman Karp Collection of Ephemera consists of approximately 6.25 linear feet of materials spanning the late 19th to mid 20th centuries. The materials represent an eclectic variety of ephemera in various formats (mostly paper), of once ubiquitous items that were expected to have short-term uses in their time, including trade cards, blotters, cigarette silks, product and dry good labels, greeting cards, postcards, and hairnet packages, among others.

Arrangement

The 17 series and corresponding subseries reflect Karp's own organization of the collection by format, and in some cases by subject.

Missing Title

  1. Series I. Greeting Cards, circa 1925-1945
  2. Series II. Postcards, circa 1906-1955
  3. Series III. Trade Cards, circa 1875-1915
  4. Series IV. Blotters, circa 1890-1955
  5. Series V. Cigarette Silks, circa 1900-1915
  6. Series VI. Needle Books, circa 1870-1955
  7. Series VII. Labels (paper and tin), circa 1875-1955
  8. Series VIII. Pictorial Glassine Snack Bags, circa 1935-1955
  9. Series IX. Hairnets in Packaging, circa 1920s-1967
  10. Series X. Decals, circa 1930-1955
  11. Series XI. World War II Ephemera (various formats), circa 1942-1945
  12. Series XII. Miscellaneous Paper Items, undated
  13. Series XIII. Annual Linoleum Pattern Books, 1921-1952
  14. Series XIV. Hairdressing Magazines, 1938-1950
  15. Series XV. Sheet Music, 1842-1948
  16. Series XVI. Photography, circa 1880s-1945
  17. Series XVII. Prints and Drawings, 1930

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Access Points

Subject Names

  • Karp, Marilynn Gelfman
  • Batchelor, Clarence Daniel, 1888-1977

Document Type

  • Cigarette cards
  • Greeting cards
  • Posters.
  • Advertisements
  • Advertising blotters
  • Calendars
  • Chromolithography
  • Editorial cartoons
  • Photographs.
  • Travel labels
  • Trade cards (advertising)
  • Stickers
  • Stationery
  • Sheet music
  • Ration books.
  • Propaganda
  • Postcards.
  • Picture postcards.
  • Pamphlets
  • Packaging
  • Needle cases
  • Military maps.
  • Magazines (periodicals)
  • Labels (identifying artifacts)
  • Hairnets
  • Glassine
  • Ephemera.
  • Envelopes
  • Decals

Subject Topics

  • Ocean liners
  • International travel
  • House furnishings
  • Hotels
  • Hatboxes
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • Hardware
  • Hairstyles
  • Hairdressing
  • Hair dyes
  • Chewing gum
  • Tonics (Medicinal preparations)
  • Free material
  • Linoleum
  • Food -- United States
  • Telegraph
  • World War, 1939-1945. -- Participation, American
  • Dry-goods -- United States
  • Victoriana
  • Agriculture
  • Household appliances
  • Advertising -- United States
  • Agricultural machinery
  • Baking
  • Beauty, Personal
  • Beverages -- United States
  • Cigarettes
  • Cigars
  • Clothing and dress -- United States
  • Collecting of accounts -- United States
  • Concessions (Amusements, etc.)
  • Cosmetics
  • Cruise lines
  • Patent medicines -- United States
  • Patriotism
  • Patriotism in advertising
  • Penmanship
  • Pins and needles
  • Pinup art
  • Housekeeping
  • Popular music -- United States
  • Leisure
  • Railroad travel
  • Rationing -- United States
  • Sewing
  • Snack food industry
  • Theater -- United States
  • Tobacco -- United States
  • Tourism
  • Transportation -- United States
  • Travel
  • Postmortem photography
  • United States. Army. Field Artillery
  • United States. Army. Signal Corps.

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Administrative Information

Access

The collection is open to qualified researchers. Portions of the collection that have been photocopied or microfilmed will be brought to the researcher in that format; microfilm can be made available through Interlibrary Loan.

Photocopying

Photocopying undertaken by staff only. Limited to twenty exposures of stable, unbound material per day. See guidelines in Print Room for details.

Citation

This collection should be cited as: Marilynn Gelfman Karp Collection of Ephemera, PR 279, Department of Prints, Photographs, and Architectural Collections, The New-York Historical Society.

References

Burns, S. B. (1990). Sleeping beauty: Memorial photography in America. Altadena, CA: Twelvetree Press.

Collecting antique tins. (n.d.). In Collectible Collectibles. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://www.collectablecollectables.com/articles.asp

Editorial chit-chat: A new style of net [Electronic version]. (1863, July). Peterson's Magazine, 44(1).

Gartrell, E. (n.d.). More about advertising ephemera and the advertising ephemera collection. In Emergence of Advertising in America: 1850-1920. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/eaa/guide/ephemera/

Hagley Museum and Library. (n.d.). Leonard W. Walton printing and packaging collection. In Hagley Museum and Library. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://www.hagley.lib.de.us/library/collections/manuscripts/findingaids/Walton_ACC2430.pdf

Heyman, T. T. (1998). Posters American style. New York: National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

"Hit Kit" spells post-war music [Electronic version]. (1944, February 19). The Billboard, 13, 17.

Karp, M. G. (2006). In flagrante collecto: Caught in the act of collecting. New York: Abrams.

Laughing Elephant. (n.d.). Luggage Labels. In The Savvy Traveller. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://www.thesavvytraveller.com/tools/laughing_elephant/1home.htm

Lester, K., & Oerke, B. V. (2004). Accessories of dress: An illustrated encyclopedia. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications. (Original work published 1940)

New York State Library. (n.d.). Wish you were here: The story of the golden age of picture postcards in the United States. In New York State Education Department. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/msscfa/qc16510ess.htm

Rickards, M. (2000). The encyclopedia of ephemera: A guide to the fragmentary documents of everyday life for the collector, curator, and historian. New York: Routledge.

Rosenberry, M. C. (1944, April). The army music program. Music Educators Journal, 30(5), 18-19, 48-49. Retrieved from JSTOR.

Ruby, J. (1995). Secure the shadow: Death and photography in America. London: The MIT Press.

Sherrow, V. (2006). Encyclopedia of hair: A cultural history. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Simmons, J. (2011). A brief history of decals. In Everything About Ceramic Decals. Retrieved June 2, 2011, from http://www.ceramicdecals.org/History_of_Decals.html

Smithsonian Institution. (n.d.). Greetings from the Smithsonian: A postcard history of the Smithsonian Institution. In Smithsonian Institution Archives. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://siarchives.si.edu/history/exhibits/postcard/chronology.htm

Snodgrass, M. E. (2004). Encyclopedia of kitchen history. New York: Fitzroy Dearborn.

T&J Collectibles. (2009). A brief history of ink blotters. In eBay Reviews & Guides. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://reviews.ebay.com/A-Brief-History-of-Ink-Blotters_W0QQugidZ10000000010357920

The history of vintage luggage (2001, November 30). In News-Antique. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://news-antique.com/?id=781960&keys=luggage-leather-crocodile

Twede, D., & Selke, S. E. (2005). Cartons, crates, and corrugated board: Handbook of paper and wood packaging technology. Lancaster, PA: DEStech Publications, Inc.

Vintage and collectible blotters. (2011, May). In Pendemonium Vintage Writing Collectibles. Retrieved June 7, 2011, from http://www.pendemonium.com/blotters.htm

Wallace, R. (1953, December 21). Please remit [Electronic version]. Life, 42-52.

Permission to reproduce or quote in publication

Application to use images from this collection for publication should be made in writing to the Department of Rights and Reproductions, The New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, New York, NY 10024. Permission to reproduce or quote text from this collection in a publication must be requested from and granted in writing by the Library Director, The New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, New York, NY 10024.

 

Related Materials

Marilynn Gelfman Karp has also donated additional ephemara objects that are cataloged and housed separately within the New-York Historical Society's Museum collection.

The Bella C. Landauer Collection of Business and Advertising Ephemera ca. 1700-present PR 031

Collection of mainly 19th and 20th century advertising ephemera. Formats in the collection include American trade cards, lottery tickets, handbills, labels, broadsides, calendars, billheads, price lists, advertising fans, and other materials of history and popular culture. Media range from rough woodcuts to chromolithographs.

Provenance

Gift of Marilynn Gelfman Karp, 2009

Sources:

Arm and Hammer Baking Soda (2008). Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://www.armhammer.com/

Burns, S. B. (1990). Sleeping beauty: Memorial photography in America. Altadena, CA: Twelvetree Press.

Collecting antique tins. (n.d.). In Collectible Collectibles. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://www.collectablecollectables.com/articles.asp

Editorial chit-chat: A new style of net [Electronic version]. (1863, July). Peterson's Magazine, 44(1).

Gartrell, E. (n.d.). More about advertising ephemera and the advertising ephemera collection. In Emergence of Advertising in America: 1850-1920. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://library.duke.edu/digitalcollections/eaa/guide/ephemera/

Hagley Museum and Library. (n.d.). Leonard W. Walton printing and packaging collection. In Hagley Museum and Library. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://www.hagley.lib.de.us/library/collections/manuscripts/findingaids/Walton_ACC2430.pdf

Heyman, T. T. (1998). Posters American style. New York: National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

"Hit Kit" spells post-war music [Electronic version]. (1944, February 19). The Billboard, 13, 17.

Karp, M. G. (2006). In flagrante collecto: Caught in the act of collecting. New York: Abrams.

Laughing Elephant. (n.d.). Luggage Labels. In The Savvy Traveller. Retrieved December 14, 2009, from Laughing Elephant. (n.d.). Luggage labels. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://www.thesavvytraveller.com/tools/laughing_elephant/1home.htm

Lester, K., & Oerke, B. V. (2004). Accessories of dress: An illustrated encyclopedia. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications. (Original work published 1940)

New York State Library. (n.d.). Wish you were here: The story of the golden age of picture postcards in the United States. In New York State Education Department. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://www.nysl.nysed.gov/msscfa/qc16510ess.htm

Rickards, M. (2000). The encyclopedia of ephemera: A guide to the fragmentary documents of everyday life for the collector, curator, and historian. New York: Routledge.

Rosenberry, M. C. (1944, April). The army music program. Music Educators Journal, 30(5), 18-19, 48-49. Retrieved from JSTOR.

Ruby, J. (1995). Secure the shadow: Death and photography in America. London: The MIT Press.

Sherrow, V. (2006). Encyclopedia of hair: A cultural history. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Simmons, J. (2011). A brief history of decals. In Everything About Ceramic Decals. Retrieved June 2, 2011, from http://www.ceramicdecals.org/History_of_Decals.html

Smithsonian Institution. (n.d.). Greetings from the Smithsonian: A postcard history of the Smithsonian Institution. In Smithsonian Institution Archives. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://siarchives.si.edu/history/exhibits/postcard/chronology.htm

Snodgrass, M. E. (2004). Encyclopedia of kitchen history. New York, NY: Fitzroy Dearborn.

T&J Collectibles. (2009). A brief history of ink blotters. In eBay Reviews & Guides. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://reviews.ebay.com/A-Brief-History-of-Ink-Blotters_W0QQugidZ10000000010357920

The history of vintage luggage (2001, November 30). In News-Antique. Retrieved December 1, 2009, from http://news-antique.com/?id=781960&keys=luggage-leather-crocodile

Twede, D., & Selke, S. E. (2005). Cartons, crates, and corrugated board: Handbook of paper and wood packaging technology. Lancaster, PA: DEStech Publications, Inc.

Vintage and collectible blotters. (2011, May). In Pendemonium Vintage Writing Collectibles. Retrieved June 7, 2011, from http://www.pendemonium.com/blotters.htm

Wallace, R. (1953, December 21). Please remit [Electronic version]. Life, 42, 52.

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Container List

Series I. Greeting Cards, circa 1925-1945

Historical note

More than any other category of ephemera, greeting cards from past years survive in great numbers, often having been used in scrapbooks, or saved as personal mementos. The greeting card or "message of good will" as a personal form of communication has a long history, but emerged commercially during the 19th century, concurrent with the rise of a new and prosperous leisured middle class, the advent of reliable, efficient postal service, and new forms of mechanization in printing methods that made the mass production of color printing affordable for the first time. In America, the first leading exponent of the greeting card was German lithographer Louis Prang (1824-1909) who is credited as being the first to introduce chromolithography to the production of greeting cards in America. By the early 20th century, the foundations for a full-fledged industry had been laid with the founding of Hallmark (today, the world's largest greeting card company) in 1910. Throughout the 20th century, the variety of card themes and sentiments would evolve dramatically, from traditional annual celebrations to the acknowledgement of almost every experience in everyday life.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 1 Folder : 1 Birthday -- Specific Age
circa 1925-1940
Box: 1 Folder : 2 Birthday -- Specific Relationship
circa 1925-1935
Box: 1 Folder : 3 Birthday -- General
circa 1925-1935
Box: 1 Folder : 4 Wedding/Engagement
circa 1925-1935
Box: 1 Folder : 5 Baby
circa 1925-1940
Box: 1 Folder : 6 Confirmation
circa 1930s
Box: 1 Folder : 7 Graduation/Commencement
circa 1920s
Box: 1 Folder : 8 Anniversary
circa 1925-1935
Box: 1 Folder : 9 Bon Voyage
circa 1925-1935
Box: 1 Folder : 10 Please Write
circa 1920s
Box: 1 Folder : 11 Get Well
circa 1925-1935
Box: 1 Folder : 12 Thinking of You
1926
Box: 1 Folder : 13 Holidays -- Christmas
circa 1915
Box: 1 Folder : 14 Holidays -- Easter
circa 1940s
Box: 1 Folder : 15 Holidays -- Valentine
circa 1920s-1940s
Box: 1 Folder : 16 World War II
circa 1940s

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Series II. Postcards, circa 1906-1955

Historical note

In the United States, the first mailable postcards appeared in 1873. These early "Postal Mailing Cards" were pre-stamped and government issued, until the Private Mailing Card Act of 1898 allowed for the independent production of postcards (called "Private Mailing Cards" until 1901, when the government first permitted privately-issued postcards to use the words "Post Card" on their reverse side). Until 1907, postcards had no "divided backs," as all messages for the addressee were allowed only on the face of the card--often in a designated message box. The advent of Chicago's World's Columbian Exposition in 1893, contributed to the immense popularity of "view cards" (or "picture postcards"), which sparked a postcard-collecting craze throughout the country, reaching its zenith in 1915. Following World War I, the postcard industry (previously dominated by German production) flourished in the United States, with millions of postcards produced, mailed, and collected annually. Today, postcards from the past continue to fascinate us, offering a compelling window into topographical and social history.

Arrangement note

The postcards in this series have been arranged thematically with subject titles assigned by the collector. Place Banner postcards are arranged alphabetically by city.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 1 Folder : 17 American Patriotism -- General
circa 1910-1976
Box: 1 Folder : 17a American Patriotism -- American Flag Incantations
before 1920
Box: 2 Folder : 18 American Patriotism -- World War I
circa 1914-1918
Box: 2 Folder : 19 American Patriotism -- World War II
circa 1940-1945
Box: 2 Folder : 20 Humor -- World War II
circa 1940-1945
Box: 2 Folder : 21 Humor -- 1940's Girlie
circa 1940s
Box: 2 Folder : 22 Multiple Choice
circa 1930-1945
Box: 2 Folder : 23 Victorian Sentiments
circa 1907-1915
Box: 2 Folder : 24 Victorian Sentiments
circa 1907-1915
Box: 2 Folder : 25 Victorian Sentiments
circa 1907-1915
Box: 2 Folder : 26 Victorian Sentiments
circa 1907-1915
Box: 2 Folder : 27 Victorian Sentiments
circa 1907-1915
Box: 2 Folder : 28 Trolleys
circa 1913-1977
Box: 3 Folder : 29 Trains
1904-circa 1970s, bulk after 1960
Box: 3 Folder : 30 Trains
circa 1907-1980s, bulk after 1960
Box: 3 Folder : 31 Trains
circa 1960s-1980s
Box: 3 Folder : 32 Stations and Waiting Rooms
circa 1910-1950, bulk 1940s
Box: 3 Folder : 33 Planes and Ships
circa 1910s-1950s
Box: 3 Folder : 34 Place Banners (U.S. Cities), A-E
circa 1910s-1940s, bulk 1910s
Box: 3 Folder : 35 Place Banners (U.S. Cities), E-M
circa 1910-1920
Box: 3 Folder : 36 Place Banners (U.S. Cities), M-P
circa 1910s
Box: 4 Folder : 37 Place Banners (U.S. Cities), S-Z
circa 1910s
Box: 18 Folder : 204 Birthday
circa 1910's-1940's
Box: 18 Folder : 205 Holidays (New Years and Valentine's Day)
circa 1900's - 1920's
Box: 18 Folder : 206 Names
circa 1900's
Box: 18 Folder : 207 Foldout
circa 1910's - 1920's
Box: 18 Folder : 208 General
circa 1900's

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Series III. Trade and Trading Cards, circa 1875-1915, 1964

Condition note

Many of the trade cards have been glued/pasted to their plastic sleeve; trade card sleeves need to be evaluated to see if they are archivally safe.

Historical note

While the concept of advertising "trade cards" dates back to the 1700s, it was not until the latter part of the 19th century that the development of trade cards gained great popularity in the United States, due in large part to advancements in affordable color printing (chromolithography). In the 1870s, the lithographer and printer Louis Prang was influential in popularizing the idea of cheaply mass-producing such cards for the needs of the advertising trade. Sometimes inserted into packages, they served as an effective means of advertising goods and services (similar to today's business cards), and had the additional appeal of offering the consumer a collectable giveaway item. Trade cards were often produced in a numbered series of related images (such as the Sollers & Co. full set in this collection) that could be incorporated into artistic crafts and scrapbooks. By the beginning of the 20th century, the production of trade cards fell into gradual disuse with the increasing prevalence of advertising in magazines and newspapers.

This series also includes a complete set of John F. Kennedy trading cards, issued by Topps in 1964. The set includes 77 cards with a large black and white photo on the front and a short caption describing the image on the back. Images depict Kennedy as President and as family man, relaxing with his wife Jackie and kids Caroline and John.

Arrangement note

This series of trade cards was received from the collector in three-ring binders and later disbound and rehoused. Both the collector's category titles and order of binder contents have been maintained in the series list below.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 4 Folder : 37 Cures
circa 1875-1910
Box: 4 Folder : 38 Druggists
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 39 Vaccines
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 40 Publishers, Stationers, and Schools
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 41 Political
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 42 Tobacco
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 43 Gum
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 44 Insurance
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 45 Soap
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 46 Laundry Products (includes starches and dye)

See Also

Laundry Products

circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 47 Hair Dyes and Restorers
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 48 Colognes
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 49 Cosmetics
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 50 Foods
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 51 Clothiers / Dry Goods
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 52 Shoes
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 53 Threads
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 54 Various (includes 2 items of theater-related ephemera)
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 55 Farm Machinery
circa 1875-1915
Box: 4 Folder : 56 Fertilizers (includes seeds and nurseries)
circa 1875-1915
Box: 5 Folder : 57 Sewing Machines
circa 1875-1915
Box: 5 Folder : 58 Steamship Lines (includes steamboats)
circa 1875-1915
Box: 5 Folder : 59 Stoves
circa 1875-1915
Box: 5 Folder : 60 Cleaners
circa 1875-1915
Box: 5 Folder : 61 Hardware
circa 1875-1915
Box: 5 Folder : 62 Oil/Glue
circa 1875-1910
Box: 5 Folder : 63 Furniture (includes pianos and organs)
circa 1875-1915
Box: 5 Folder : 64 Various (includes brick presses, sifters, pumps & fire engines, shotgun powder, vehicles)
circa 1875-1915
Box: 5 Folder : 65 Sollers & Co. Trade Cards (full set)
circa 1880
Box: 5 Folder : 66 Redeemable Baking Soda Trade Cards

Historical Note

Arm & Hammer Baking Soda, founded in 1846, began inserting trade cards within their packaging in 1888 and remained a popular household collectable for five decades. Issued in 2 sizes (1 7/8" x 3" and 1 1/2" x 2 1/4"), they are especially notable for their sophisticated aesthetics and early promotion of wildlife conservation. Among those included in this collection, are examples from the earliest issued series "Beautiful Birds of America."

circa 1875-1915
Box: 5 Folder : 67 Blatz Chewing Gum "Screen Stars" (full set)
circa 1920s
Box: 18 Folder : 209 John F. Kennedy Trading Cards
1964

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Series IV. Blotters, circa 1890-1955

Historical note

With the introduction of the first practical fountain pens during the 1880s, card blotters were a popular and practical novelty giveaway item by many businesses. Once as ubiquitous as today's business cards, advertising blotters stood ever-ready by the home phone, or on the desk, as a reminder of goods and services offered. Their designs (which often featured monthly calendars) ranged from the traditional promotion of retailers, banks, and insurance companies, to risque pinup art. By the 1950s, the increasing popularity of ballpoint pens led to a gradual end to this advertising trend.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 5 Folder : 68 Food
circa 1890s-1940s
Box: 5 Folder : 69 Products/Services
circa 1890s-1940s
Box: 5 Folder : 70 Products/Services
circa 1890s-1940s
Box: 5 Folder : 71 Products/Services
circa 1890s-1940s
Box: 6 Folder : 73 Pinup Girls
circa 1940s
Box: 6 Folder : 74 Pinup Girls
circa 1940s-1950s

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Series V. Cigarette Silks, circa 1900-1915

Historical note

A variation of the cigarette card, cigarette silks served as promotional giveaways included in cigarette packaging of the early 20th century. Highly collectable in their time, they were printed in various thematic series (birds, butterflies, actresses, etc.) of 25 or more, instigating repeat purchases of the same brand. Cigarette silks had particular marketing appeal to women, who would often incorporate them into decorative household items, such as quilts, pillows, and table coverings.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 6 Folder : 75 Birds
circa 1900-1915
Box: 6 Folder : 76 Chickens
circa 1910-1915
Box: 6 Folder : 77 Actresses
circa 1900-1915
Box: 6 Folder : 78 Porcelain (Set of 15)
circa 1900-1915
Box: 6 Folder : 79 Various
circa 1900-1915

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Series VI. Needle Books, circa 1870-1955

Historical note

Commercial needle books (or packets) began to be manufactured in the early 19th century, in the Redditch District of central England. By the mid 19th century, needle-making machinery had fully mechanized production, and needle book graphics became increasingly elaborate. Like trade cards, they served as portable forms of advertising for various goods and services, often emphasizing domestic and travel-related imagery.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 6 Folder : 80 Needle Books
circa 1870-1925
Box: 6 Folder : 83 Needle Books
circa 1910s-1950s
Box: 6 Folder : 81 Needle Books
circa 1920s-1950s
Box: 6 Folder : 82 Needle Books
circa 1920s-1950s

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Series VII. Labels (paper and tin), circa 1875-1955

Historical note

Product Labels: While the practice of utilizing printed labels is as old as printing itself, modern package design did not begin to evolve until after the Civil War when advancements in printing, paper production and chromolithography made the affordable mass production of elaborate and colorful designs possible. By 1900, chromolithography would reach its zenith, prompting some to call the latter half of the 19th century the period of "chromo-civilization." Included here are various examples of how printed labels were utilized for packaging, identification, and instructive purposes, displaying a fascinating compendium of design styles and influences reflective of their eras.

Hatbox Labels: The modern hatbox (a derivative of the Victorian bandbox) was a frequent item found among the possessions of both men and women well into the mid 20th century, when the wearing of hats was customary for all occasions. As a valued accessory, it was a standard practice for hats to be sold with hatboxes for their protection. These boxes (commonly made of sturdy pasteboard and decorative paper), came adorned with an elegant label displaying the name of the manufacturer or department store where purchased, along with a convenient carrying strap. In this way, the box transcended its practicality by serving as a portable form of status and advertising for both the owner and the retailer. Perhaps because of their usefulness as physical containers, attractive packaging, and the sentiment attached to them as objects of value, many hatboxes have survived among families over several generations and continue to be utilized and collected for a variety of purposes.

Luggage Labels: Luggage labels, with their elegant graphics featuring exotic locals, luxury modes of transportation, and grand hotels, bear witness to the "Golden Age of Travel," a period which spanned the late 19th century to the outbreak of World War II. Affixed to luggage by railroad companies, steamships, hotels, and resorts, they provided the practical means of identifying luggage destination, but also served as romantic advertisements for the destinations themselves. For the traveler, such labels were a sign of personality, taste and status, and over the course of years, their accumulation provided an autobiographical history of places visited, hotels stayed in, and transportation used. A remnant of past places and times, they beautifully evoke the spirit of this bygone era.

Please Remit: The economic prosperity of the 1950s, spurred by the growth of commercial advertising and the introduction of the modern credit card, gave way to unprecedented consumer optimism and spending, as more and more Americans embraced the ease and convenience of "putting it on plastic" as a way to pay for purchases. For many collection agencies, a useful aid in collecting debts was the "Please Remit" notice, inserted into billing envelopes as a way to cajole payments from debtors after two or three months of unpaid bills. Today these "friendly reminders" provide a nostalgic look at the mores and manners of an earlier time.

Historical Note

Product Labels
 While the practice of utilizing printed labels is as old as printing itself, modern package design did not begin to evolve until after the Civil War when advancements in printing, paper production and chromolithography made the affordable mass production of elaborate and colorful designs possible. By 1900, chromolithography would reach its zenith, prompting some to call the latter half of the nineteenth century the period of "chromo-civilization." Included here are various examples of how printed labels were utilized for packaging, identification, and instructive purposes, displaying a fascinating compendium of design styles and influences reflective of their eras.
Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 7 Folder : 84 Product Labels -- Grooming
circa 1900-1935
Box: 7 Folder : 85 Product Labels -- Food and Beverage; Household (includes booklet of baking labels)
circa 1900s-1940s
Box: 7 Folder : 86 Product Labels -- Olive Oil (printed tin)
circa 1875-1955
Box: 7 Folder : 87 Product Labels -- RX
circa 1920s-1950s
Box: 7 Folder : 88 Hatbox Labels
circa 1900s-1950s
Box: 7 Folder : 89
Box: 7 Folder : 90
Box: 7 Folder : 91 See The Pyramids (luggage labels)
circa 1900s-1940s
Box: 7 Folder : 92 Wire It (telegraph poster stamps, labels and postcards)
circa 1930s-1950s
Box: 7 Folder : 93 Please Remit
undated

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Series VIII. Pictorial Glassine Snack Bags, circa 1935-1955

Historical note

Glassine paper, a smooth and semitransparent glazed, greaseproof and leak resistant product, was developed in 1905 and soon became adapted as an ideal packaging material for fast foods and snacks. In 1908, the Milwaukee Printing Company developed a method of printing on glassine paper, and these printed bags and wrappers (often with lively typeface and engaging graphics) became a standard feature at American concession stands, for such fare as hamburgers, peanuts, and ice cream bars.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 7 Folder : 94 Pictorial Glassine Snack Bags
circa 1930s-1950s

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Series IX. Hairnets in Packaging, circa 1920s-1967

Historical Note

Hairnets (once known as "cauls," or "snoods") have been used in various forms since ancient times, serving both utilitarian and decorative purposes. While initially constructed of materials such as silk and ribbon, the first commercial reference to hairnets made of human hair appeared in July, 1863, as an editorial feature in Peterson's Magazine (Vol. XLIV, No. 1). By 1914, the hairnet was a common hair accessory for women, and over the ensuing years became increasingly promoted for use in the nursing and food service professions. The emancipated bobbed hairstyles of the 1920s brought a temporary decline in the use of hairnets. Their popularity was revived by World War II, a period which saw the return of longer hairstyles and the entrance of women into the industrial workforce. Further refinements to hairnet manufacturing included the introduction of Du Pont's multifilament nylon yarn in 1940, offering unprecedented resiliency and wear.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 7 Folder : 95 Hairnets in Packaging
circa 1910s-1960s
Box: 7 Folder : 96 Hairnets in Packaging
circa 1940s-1960s

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Series X. Decals, circa 1930-1955

Historical note

The invention of transfer decals, attributed to the French engraver Simon François Ravenet (a process he coined "decalquer" or "to copy by tracing"), originated in England in the mid 18th century, initially as a method by which to transfer decorative designs to pottery using engraved copper plates and tissue paper. Over the course of the 19th century, a variety of advancements in technology such as lithography, the paper making machine, and the invention of duplex paper, made the affordable mass production of decals possible. The introduction of silk screen printing in the early 20th century allowed a top-coat or cover-coat of lacquer to be added to the decal design (so-called water-mount decals) which could be transferred when wet.

Introduced to the United States by approximately 1865, the demand for decals reached its zenith in the 1870s resulting in what came to be called "decalcomania." Decals remain popular today offering an inexpensive way to decorate and enhance a variety of objects and surfaces.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 8 Folder : 97 Star Cal -- Favorite Stars
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 98 Children/Nursery
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 99 Seashore
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 100 Mermaids and Swans
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 101 Birds
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 102 Flamingos
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 103 Flowers and Fruit
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 104 Dishes
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 105 Servers
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 106 Pinup Art
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 107 Holland
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 108 Mexico
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 109 Travel Souvenirs
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 110 Signs
circa 1940-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 111 Various
circa 1930-1955
Box: 8 Folder : 112 Glassine Decal Packaging
circa 1930-1955
Box: 18 Folder : 210 Cockamamies and skin-transfers [tattoos]
circa 1940's - 1950's
Box: 18A Folder : 216 Impko miniature decals
circa 1950's - 1960's

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Series XI. World War II Ephemera (various formats), circa 1942-1945

Condition note

Materials in this series are very fragile

See also

Greeting Cards, Postcards, and Sheet Music

Historical note

Ration Books and OPA Points: In August, 1941, President D. Roosevelt created the Office of Price Administration (OPA) in order to regulate both the purchase and cost of consumer goods during a period of severely limited imports and wartime shortages. By the spring of 1942, the first of 4 series of War Ration Books and stamps or "points" were issued to each American family. The program served as a way to promote the "fair share of certain goods made short by war," and carefully control the amount of foods, necessities, and luxuries any one person could buy. For the average citizen, such daily sacrifice represented a challenging but essential and patriotic contribution to the American war effort.

Army Navy Hit Kit Songs: In 1941, a Sub-Committee on Music was established by the Joint Army and Navy Committee on Welfare and Recreation to advise the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps on matters relating to musical activities and entertainment for servicemen both in and outside military camps and reservations from 1941-1946. A popular part of this program began in 1943 with the monthly issuing of pamphlet-size songbooks called "Army Navy Hit Kits" containing the lyrics and music of popular songs of the period, including both "Hit Parade" and patriotic-themed songs. Important morale boosters during the war years, Hit Kit pamphlets, issued by the War Department's Special Services Division, were available only to military personnel and not for sale to the general public.

U.S. War Department Photographs: 47 linen-backed captioned training photographs (from a pre-World War II US War Department Federal Binder) by US Army Signal Corps of US Field Artillery Pack Units (4th, 97th, 98th and 99th Battalions), showing training for combat at US Bases in 1941-1942.

Smilin' Jack Bubblegum Cards: Full, uncut set of 128 Smilin' Jack bubblegum cards with "Buy War Bonds & Stamps for Victory" on verso. This set is based on the 1943 movie serial, and the aviation comic strip (also 1943).

Posters: During World War II, American government officials successfully harnessed the use of propaganda through the poster medium in an effort to mobilize the nation towards a united and urgent support for the war effort and American victory. A major function of the Office of War Information (OWI), created in 1942, was responsibility for controlling the content and imagery of war posters, and ensuring their monthly distribution and promotion across the nation. Drawing from the powerful and persuasive stylistic conventions of the advertising industry, American home front posters embraced American consciousness with themes that emphasized the nature of the enemy, the nature of the allies, the need to work, fight, and sacrifice, and the need to protect the principles of American freedom.

See also: Greeting Cards, Postcards, Sheet Music, and Posters

Ration Books and OPA Points: In August, 1941, President D. Roosevelt created the Office Price Administration (O.P.A.) in order to regulate both the purchase and cost of consumer goods during a period of severely limited imports and wartime shortages. By the spring of 1942, the first of 4 series of War Ration Books and stamps or "points" were issued to each American family. The program served as a way to promote the "fair share of certain goods made short by war," and carefully control the amount of foods, necessities, and luxuries any one person could buy. For the average citizen, such daily sacrifice represented a challenging but essential and patriotic contribution to the American war effort.

Army Navy Hit Kit Songs: In 1941, a Sub-committee on Music was established by the Joint Army and Navy Committee on Welfare and Recreation to advise the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps on matters relating to musical activities and entertainment for servicemen both in and outside military camps and reservations from 1941-1946. A popular part of this program began in 1943 with the monthly issuing of pamphlet-size songbooks called "Army Hit Kits" containing the lyrics and music of popular songs of the period, including both "Hit Parade" and patriotic-themed songs. Important moral boosters during the war years, Hit Kit pamphlets, issued by the War Department's Special Services Division, were available only to military personnel and not for sale to the general public.

Photographs: 47 linen-backed captioned training photographs (from a pre-WWII US War Department Federal Binder), by US Army Signal Corps of US Field Artillery Pack Units (4th, 97th, 98th and 99th Battalions), showing training for combat at US Bases in 1941-1942.

Smilin' Jack Bubblegum Cards: Full, uncut set of 121 Smilin' Jack bubble gum cards, Buy War Bonds & Stamps for Victory, based on the 1943 movie serial, and the aviation comic strip (also 1943).

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 8 Folder : 113 Ration Books And OPA Points
circa 1940s
Box: 8 Folder : 114 Victory Stationary
circa 1940s
Box: 8 Folder : 115 Army Navy Hit Kit Songs
1944
Box: 8 Folder : 116 Wartime Maps
circa 1940s
Box: 8 Folder : 117 Weapons for Victory Flyers
circa 1940s
Oversize: Flat File Folder : 117a Smilin' Jack Bubblegum Cards (full set)
1943
Box: 8 Folder : 118 World War II - Various
circa 1940s
Box: 8 Folder : 119 U.S. War Department Photographs
1941-1942
Box: 8 Folder : 120 U.S. War Department Photographs
1941-1942
Box: 8 Folder : 121 U.S. War Department Photographs
1941-1942
Box: 9 Folder : 122 U.S. War Department Photographs
1941-1942
Box: 9 Folder : 123 Post World War II (American market) -- American Japanese Holiday Coloring and Talking Book
circa 1950s-1960s
Oversize: Flat File Folder : 197 Posters
1942-1943
Box: 19 Folder : 211 Field manual for first aid; War Injuries pamphlets
1943-1944
Box: 19 Folder : 212 Fighting Yanks Around the World by Thomas Penfield
1943-1944
Box: 19 Folder : 213 Low on the War, A Cartoon Commentary of the Years 1939-1941
1941

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Series XII. Miscellaneous Paper Items, undated

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 19 Folder : 215 Cigar Pouch [depicts woman dumping chamber bowl out of window onto gentleman below]
circa 1880
Box: 9 Folder : 124 Lost Pet Notices
undated

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Series XIII. Annual Linoleum Pattern Books, 1921-1952

Historical note

The invention of linoleum, a name coined from the Latin words "linum" (flax) and "oleum" (oil), was patented in England in 1860 by Frederik Walton, a rubber manufacturer, who founded the first linoleum company in 1864. By the end of the decade, linoleum was introduced to the United States, with the first US-based production beginning in 1874. Affordable, attractive, and resilient, as well as naturally bactericidal, flame and scratch-resistant, linoleum became a favorite surface material in American homes and hospitals, offering vibrant colors and myriad of creative patterns that included imitation marble, stone, mosaics, and faux carpeting designs. Lighter gauge linoleum was also created for use on walls, including Lincrusta (Lincrusta-Walton), Linowall (Armstrong), and Sealex Wall-Covering and Congowall (Congoleum).

By the 1930s, Armstrong was the largest manufacturer of linoleum in the America, offering consumers hundreds of patterns from which to choose. Linoleum manufacturers published "pattern books" to advertise their designs, and offered homemakers free booklets with illustrated advice for incorporating linoleum into their interior decorating schemes.

In the years following World War II, the introduction of cheaper PVC (vinyl) flooring brought the use of linoleum into sharp decline. Today, patterned linoleum is enjoying renewed popularity as a "green" recyclable flooring alternative that is environmentally friendly and biodegradable.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 9 Folder : 125 Armstrong
1923-1928
Box: 9 Folder : 126 Armstrong
1921-1930
Box: 9 Folder : 127 Armstrong
1930-1931
Box: 9 Folder : 128 Armstrong
1936
Box: 9 Folder : 129 Armstrong
1937
Box: 10 Folder : 130 Armstrong
1944
Box: 10 Folder : 131 Armstrong
1949
Box: 10 Folder : 132 Armstrong
1952
Box: 10 Folder : 133 Armstrong
1953
Box: 10 Folder : 134 Certain-teed
1928
Box: 10 Folder : 135 Sloane
1928
Box: 10 Folder : 136 Sloane
1952
Box: 10 Folder : 137 Congoleum Nairn
1924-1943
Box: 11 Folder : 138 Pabco
1941-1949
Box: 11 Folder : 139 Bird
1941-1946
Box: 11 Folder : 140 Floor and Wall Coverings: Prepared Especially for Home Study
1952
Box: 11 Folder : 141 Photographs of Window Displays
circa 1920s
Box: 11.A Armstrong- Linoleum Frame

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Series XIV. Magazines, 1938-1960

Subseries XIV.1: Hairdressing Magazines, 1938-1950

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 11 Folder : 142 Modern Beauty Shop
1938 December
Box: 11 Folder : 143 Modern Beauty Shop
1939 January (Sections I & II)
Box: 11 Folder : 144 Modern Beauty Shop
1939 May (Section II)
Box: 11 Folder : 145 Modern Beauty Shop
1939 June
Box: 11 Folder : 146 Modern Beauty Shop
1939 October
Box: 11 Folder : 147 Modern Beauty Shop
1939 December
Box: 12 Folder : 148 Modern Beauty Shop
1940 April
Box: 12 Folder : 149 Modern Beauty Shop
1940 July
Box: 12 Folder : 150 Modern Beauty Shop
1940 August
Box: 12 Folder : 151 Modern Beauty Shop
1940 November
Box: 12 Folder : 152 Modern Beauty Shop
1941 November
Box: 12 Folder : 153 Modern Beauty Shop
1942 December
Box: 12 Folder : 154 Modern Beauty Shop
1943 January (Section I)
Box: 12 Folder : 155 Modern Beauty Shop
1943 December
Box: 12 Folder : 156 Modern Beauty Shop
1945 December
Box: 12 Folder : 157 Modern Beauty Shop
1946 January
Box: 12 Folder : 158 Modern Beauty Shop
1946 April
Box: 12 Folder : 159 Modern Beauty Shop
1946 December
Box: 12 Folder : 160 Modern Beauty Shop
1947 January
Box: 12 Folder : 161 The American Hairdresser
1939 June
Box: 12 Folder : 162 The American Hairdresser
1939 December
Box: 13 Folder : 163 The American Hairdresser
1940 December
Box: 13 Folder : 164 The American Hairdresser
1941 December
Box: 13 Folder : 165 The American Hairdresser
1942 December
Box: 13 Folder : 166 The American Hairdresser
1946 January
Box: 13 Folder : 167 The American Hairdresser
1946 December
Box: 13 Folder : 168 The American Hairdresser
1948 December
Box: 13 Folder : 169 The American Hairdresser
1949 December
Box: 13 Folder : 170 The American Hairdresser
1950 January

Subseries XIV.2: Nudist magazines, 1947-1960

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 19 Folder : 214 Sunshine & Health
1947 May, 1959 April, 1960 December
Box: 19 Folder : 214 Sunbathing for Health
1948 June, 1951 July
Box: 19 Folder : 214 Natural Herald
1950 December - 1951 March, 1953
Box: 19 Folder : 214 Health & Efficiency
1951
Box: 19 Folder : 214 Nudisme et Beaute
1951 September - October
Box: 19 Folder : 214 Tidlosa
1957
Box: 19 Folder : 214 Sun and Health
1960 April
Box: 19 Folder : 214 Nudism explained!
undated

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Series XV. Sheet Music, 1842-1948

Historical note

The sheet music found in this collection spans over a century, from 1842-1948. Today, sheet music is a particularly valuable form of ephemera, with its text and pictorial covers offering keen insight into contemporary pastimes and the societal and racial attitudes of their eras. In the 1840s, such pictorial covers were characterized by simple black and white designs often incorporating ornamental scrollwork and simple lettering, and were commonly reproduced with woodcuts, steel engraving, and lithography. Advances in color printing technology (chromolithography) by the end of the 19th century brought about an increased focus on illustrated covers, which became a successful vehicle for commercial artists. As the Industrial Revolution gave rise to prosperity and the growth of the middle classes, Americans found themselves with increased time for leisure activities, which included the home piano as a popular form of entertainment. In America, the production and popularity of sheet music would reach its heyday in the late 19th century, with the rise of Tin Pan Alley and the American music publishing industry. Over the ensuing decades, demand for sheet music would gradually lessen in importance with the introduction of the phonograph and radio, and the advent of the record industry.

Arrangement note

The thematic groups in the series list below were previously arranged by the collector, with category titles assigned by N-YHS. The remaining sheet music in the collection has been arranged by decade.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 14 Folder : 171 New York
1896-1935
Box: 14 Folder : 172 African-American
1860-1918
Box: 14 Folder : 173 Patriotic
1898-1941
Box: 14 Folder : 174 Patriotic
1898-1941
Box: 14 Folder : 175 Patriotic
1898-1941
Box: 14 Folder : 176 Patriotic
1898-1941
Box: 15 Folder : 177 Various subjects
1800s
Box: 15 Folder : 178 Various subjects
1900-1909
Box: 15 Folder : 179 Various subjects
1900-1909
Box: 15 Folder : 180 Various subjects
1900-1909
Box: 15 Folder : 181 Various subjects
1900-1909
Box: 15 Folder : 182 Various subjects
1900-1909
Box: 15 Folder : 183 Various subjects
1900-1909
Box: 15 Folder : 184 Various subjects
1900-1909
Box: 16 Folder : 185 Various subjects
1910-1919
Box: 16 Folder : 186 Various subjects
1910-1919
Box: 16 Folder : 187 Various subjects
1910-1919
Box: 16 Folder : 188 Various subjects
1910-1919
Box: 16 Folder : 189 Various subjects
1921-1925
Box: 16 Folder : 190 Various subjects
1926-1929
Box: 16 Folder : 191 Various subjects
1932-1934
Box: 16 Folder : 192 Various subjects
1935-1939
Box: 16 Folder : 193 Various subjects
1940-1948

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Series XVI. Photography, circa 1880s-1945, circa 1880s-1945

See also

World War II Ephemera (various formats)

Historic note

Postmortem Photography: More than any other form of pictorial representation, photography is inextricably tied to remembrance and its invention forever changed the way we relate with and document our world. Following closely on the heels of photography's introduction was the practice of postmortem photography, which, after 1841, spread across America becoming prevalent in both urban and rural areas, and remained culturally embraced well into the early 20th century. From 1840-1880, the majority of postmortem images were taken within the private home, where the body was posed naturalistically. While sometimes depicted as if alive and awake, very often the deceased were shown as if to be sleeping peacefully rather than dead, an illusion that gently denies death, while at the same time serving to beautify, soften, and romanticize it. By the latter 19th century, with the rise of the funeral and embalming industries, straightforward full length "casket photographs" became very popular, focusing less on the individual, and more on the social aspect of the funeral event or funeral parlor setting (where the corpse was often upstaged by profuse floral arrangements).

Today these images serve as culturally bound artifacts that provide a trace of the sociocultural importance that such image making had for their producers and users. Photographs of a deceased loved one functioned as icons, substitutes, and reminders of loss. Most importantly, they captured memory by recording for posterity a lasting image of the deceased.

Salamagundi Club, NYC, May 5, 1945: Mounted black and white photograph of the 75th Anniversary Special Exhibition Dinner of the Salamagundi Club, which includes 55 well-known New York artists and their works hanging on the background walls. The Salamagundi Club (also known as the Salamagundi Art Club) was founded in 1871 and still remains active today with (as of 2009) over 800 members.

Gansevoort and West Washington Markets, NYC, 1903: Embossed, mounted black and white photograph of the Gansevoort and West Washington Markets, showing a multitude of vendors, wagons, goods, and commercial oyster bars.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Oversize: Flat File Folder : 194 NYC: Salamagundi Club
1945
Oversize: Flat File Folder : 194 NYC: Gansevoort and West Washington Markets
1903
Oversize: Flat File Folder : 195 Postmortem Photographs
circa 1880-1920

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Series XVII. Prints and Drawings, 1930, 1930

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Oversize: Flat File Folder : 196 New York Post Cartoon by Clarence Batchelor (3-color final drawing)
1930

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Series XVIII. Miscellaneous publications relating to New York City

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 16 Folder : 194 Magazine- New York Latest Collections: spring and summer 1927
Box: 16 Folder : 195 Interborough Rapid Transit: The Subway in New York

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Series XIX. Ivan Karp- OK Harris

Scope and Contents

This series consists of a range of flyers and advertisment postcards outlining upcoming exhibitions at OK Harris, and a variety of prints and posters exhibited at O.K. Harris from the establishment of the gallery in 1969 to its close in 2014.

Subseries XIX.1 OK Harris flyers

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 13 Folder : 170.A OK Harris flyers
1970-1974
Box: 13 Folder : 170.B OK Harris exhibition flyers
1975-1979
Box: 13 Folder : 170.C OK Harris flyers
1986, 1988, 1989

Subseries XIX.2 OK Harris advertisement postcards

Arrangement

The dates of these advertisement postcards range from 1969, when OK Harris was founded, until its close in 2014. These files have been arranged chronologically and are separated by dividers. As a result of the requirements, some files have been removed from box 17 and are stored in document sized folders held box 13.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 17 OK Harris Advertisement Postcards
1969-2014
Box: 13 Folder : 170.D OK Harris Advertisement Postcards
1969-1973
Box: 13 Folder : 170.E OK Harris Advertisement Postcards
1974-1977
Box: 13 Folder : 170.F OK Harris Advertisement Postcards
1977-2012

Subseries XIX.3. O.K. Harris exhibition prints and posters

Scope and Contents

Consists of a variety of prints and posters that were exhibited and relate to exhibits held at O.K. Harris.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Oversize: Flat File Folder : 198 Radical Realism I (6 prints)

Scope and Contents

Includes 6 signed and numbered lithographed prints from the exhibition Radical Realism I presented to O.K. Harris by the Mother Lode Editions and Hundred Acres Gallery. The names of the artists and their prints are as follows: John Clem Clarke, Bacchanal; Richard Estes, Cafeteria; Ralph Goings, Paul's Corner; Richard McClean, Native Dancer; Malcolm Morley, Rhine Chataeu; and John Salt, Arrested Vehicle in Red Seats.

Oversize: Flat File Folder : 199 Baeder, John (3 prints)

Scope and Contents

Includes 3 prints by John Baeder. The names of these prints are as follows: Big Boy Bop (1985) signed; Scotts's Brige Diner (1975); Lan Ting NYC signed.

Oversize: Flat File Folder : 199 Bechtle, Robert (1 print)

Scope and Contents

Includes 1 signed untitled print by John Baeder

Oversize: Flat File Folder : 200 Cone, Davis (3 prints)

Scope and Contents

Includes 3 signed prints by Davis Cone. The names of these prints are as follows: Criterion Center (1988); Greenwich; and Orleans

Oversize: Flat File Folder : 200 Kacere, John (3 prints)

Scope and Contents

Includes 3 prints by John Kacere. The names of these prints are as follows: White Satin Rear View (1973), signed; Greta (1982); Greta (1982), poster.

Oversize: Flat File Folder : 201 Goings, Ralph (6 prints)

Scope and Contents

Includes 6 prints by Ralph Goings. The names of these prints are as follows: Still Life With Creamer (1985); Hot Sauce, signed; Ralph's Diner; Cream Pie; Kentucky Fried Chicken, signed; and Catsup.

Oversize: Flat File Folder : 202 McClean, Richard (2 prints)

Scope and Contents

Includes 2 prints by Richard McClean. The names of these prints are as follows: Spring Doe; Man Holding Reins of White Horse.

Oversize: Flat File Folder : 202 Salt, John (4 prints)

Scope and Contents

Includes 4 prints by Davis Cone. The names of these prints are as follows: Blue Car/Red Car Upper Right; White Pontiac, signed; Blue Car Interior, signed; and Galerie Delta Rotterdam (1981), poster.

Oversize: Flat File Folder : 203 Variety of posters relating to O.K. Harris exhibitions

Scope and Contents

Includes a variety of posters and prints from various exhibitions. The names of the artist and their prints are as follows: Oscar Lakeman; Greg Constantine (1987), poster; Ivan C. Karp, photographs from the 40s and 50s, poster; Ivan C, Karp, The Face of Contemporary Art: A Celebration of 40 Years of Fine Arts Dealership, poster; John Fawcett, Walt Disney's Comics and Stories, signed; John Fawcett, Drawings and Comic Books, signed; Keung Szeto (1988), Hong Kong Institute for Promotion of Chinese Culture, poster; H.N. Han, signed; Jonathan Janson, Oz (1990); Duane Hanson, Randers Kunstmuseum: Amerikanske Realister, poster.

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