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Guide to the Franz Sigel Papers
1806-1930 (bulk 1848-1880)
 MS 565

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
New York, NY 10024
Phone: (212) 873-3400


New-York Historical Society

Collection processed by Corrinne Collett. Finding aid by Christine George.

This finding aid was produced using ArchivesSpace on September 23, 2018
English using Describing Archives: A Content Standard

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Sigel, Franz, 1824-1902
Creator: United States. President (1861-1865 : Lincoln)
Title: Franz Sigel papers
Dates [inclusive]: 1806-1930 (bulk 1848-1880)
Abstract: Franz Sigel was a German American general during the American Civil War who was enormously popular with German immigrants. His papers include correspondence, including correspondence from President Abraham Lincoln; military materials, which includes battle orders and maps; and other personal writings and ephemera. Many of the materials in this collection are in German. Portions of this collection relating to the Civil War have been digitized and are available to on-site researchers and to users affiliated with subscribing institutions via EBSCOhost.
Quantity: 3.2 Linear Feet in 8 boxes and 1 oversize tube
Call Phrase: MS 565

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Biographical Note

Missing Title
November 18, 1824 Sigel born in Sinsheim in the Grand Duchy of Baden (modern day Germany)
1843 Sigel graduated from the Military Academy at Karsruche and joined the army of the Grand Duke of Baden
1848 Sigel joined the Germany revolution and resigned his military commission
May 1852 Sigel moved to New York after being in exile in Switzerland and England
1855 Sigel established the German-American Institute in New York City with his father-in-law, Rudolf Dulon where Sigel taught mathematics, history, and languages
1857 Sigel was hired as a professor at the German-American Institute in St. Louis
1860 Sigel was elected director of St. Louis public schools
May 4, 1861 Sigel was commissioned as a colonel of the 3rd Missouri Infantry
August 7, 1861 Sigel was promoted to brigadier general (effective May 17)
Winter 1861 Sigel resigned from the Union Army in protest when his command was given to Samuel R. Curtis. This is the first of his two resignations.
March 7-8, 1862 Sigel led a division at the Battle of Pea Ridge. This was one of Sigel's few notable military victories during the Civil War.
March 21, 1862 Sigel was promoted to major general of volunteers
Winter 1862-February 1863 Sigel was given command of the XI Corps in the Army of the Potomac, which was mainly made up of German immigrants who wanted to "fight mit Sigel." Sigel was relieved by Major General Oliver O. Howard in February 1863
February 1864 Sigel was given command of the Department of West Virginia
May 15, 1864 Sigel suffered an embarrassing defeat at the Battle of New Market
July 8, 1864 Sigel was removed from active command
May 4, 1865 Sigel resigned from the Union Army for the second and final time
1869 Sigel ran for New York Secretary of State only to be defeated by the Boss Tweed's candidate
1886 Sigel was appointed U.S. Pension Agent for New York, a position he held through to 1889
August 21, 1902 Sigel died in New York City

Franz Sigel was born on November 18, 1824 in Sinsheim in the Grand Duchy of Baden, what is now modern day Germany. His military career began upon his graduation in 1843 from the Military Academy at Karsruche when he joined the Grand Duke of Baden's army. His time in the army was short though, because Sigel resigned his commission in order to partake in the the Revolutions of 1848 in Germany. Sigel was rather notable among the revolutionaries because he had actual military experience. After the Prussians put down the revolution, Forty-Eighters (those who had supported the revolution) fled Germany in droves. Sigel was one of those Forty-Eighters and lived in exile in Switzerland, France, and England.

At some point after the revolution, Sigel married Elsie Dulton with whom he eventually had five children, which included three sons and a daughter: Rudolph, Paul, Franz Jr., and Lulu. No information is available about the fifth child. Sigel's granddaughter, Paul's daughter, Elsie, was a missionary among Chinese immigrants in New York City. She gained notoriety 1909 when there was extensive newspaper coverage of her sensational murder allegedly committed by one of the immigrants she had been helping.

In May 1852, Sigel, like many Forty-Eighters before him, came to the United States and settled in New York City. Sigel began building his ties with the German immigrant community when he established the German-American Institute in New York City with his father-in-law, Rudolf Duton. Sigel taught mathematics, history, and languages at the Institute. Sigel also taught at the German Turner Society, which was an institution that believed in mixing learning and exercise. During this period Sigel was also active in the 5th New York Militia. Sigel then moved to St. Louis in 1857 to become a professor at the German-American Institute there. In 1860 Sigel was elected director of St. Louis' public schools.

Like many other Forty-Eighters, Sigel was considered a progressive who opposed slavery. When the American Civil War began on April 12, 1861, Sigel was ready to join the fray. He was commissioned as a colonel of the 3rd Missouri Infantry in the Union Army on May 4, 1861. Soon Sigel became a household name--at least in German households. In what was considered a political maneuver, President Abraham Lincoln promoted Sigel to the rank of brigadier general. The reason for this promotion most likely had something to do with the rallying cry from German immigrants—"I goes to fight mit Sigel." (There was also a popular civil war song with that slogan for a title.) Sigel was a significant help when it came to recruiting German immigrants for the Union Army. Interestingly, there were several Civil War generals who were German Forty-Eighters including Carl Schurz, Louis Blenker, and Alexander Schimmelfennig.

Unfortunately Sigel's recruiting successes did not carry over to the battlefield. There were some notable victories during the early years of the war, such as the Battle of Pea Ridge which took place on March 7-8, 1862. However, Sigel's American military career was punctuated by a resignation in 1861, which he did in protest over being replaced, and numerous losses on the battlefield. Although he was removed from active command, Sigel managed to stay in Lincoln's good graces due to his popularity with the German immigrants. On May 15, 1864, Sigel suffered an embarrassing loss at the Battle of New Market where the Confederate force had a number of cadets from the Virginia Military Institute whose average age was eighteen. Sigel continued in the Union Army without active command until his second and final resignation on May 4, 1865.

As a civilian, Sigel kept active in politics. He attempted to run for New York Secretary of State in 1869, but he was defeated by Boss Tweed's candidate. Boss Tweed was a political machine boss. He is associated with Tammany Hall, a notorious New York political machine which was founded in 1876, devoted to Democrats, and fueled by Irish immigrants. In 1886, Sigel was appointed U.S. Pension Agent for New York and he held the position until 1889. On August 21, 1902 Sigel died in New York City.

Sources:

Stephen D. Engle, Yankee Dutchman: The Life of Franz Sigel Louisiana State University Press, 1999.

"Franz Sigel," Civil War Trust, available at http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/biographies/franz-sigel.html.

"Franz Sigel," Encyclopedia Virginia, available at http://encyclopediavirginia.org/Sigel_Franz_1824-1902

"Gen. Franz Sigel Dead," N.Y. Times, Aug. 22, 1902.

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Scope and Content

The Franz Sigel Papers consist mainly of correspondence and military materials. The correspondence, which includes Sigel's as well as some of his family members, spans over important periods in history, such as the German revolution of 1848, waves of German immigration into the United States, and the American Civil War. The military papers include correspondence, reports, orders of battle, and maps. There are also a number of Sigel's writings and translations as well as materials that others have written in his honor. Although many of the military documents are in English, most of Sigel's personal documents are in German. In part because Sigel was a high-ranking military officer during the Civil War whose rise was suspected to be due to political maneuvering than military prowess, there are a number of letters written to President Abraham Lincoln, both from and concerning Sigel. There are also copies of letters and dispatches with Lincoln's signature. Please note that manuscript items written by U.S. Presidents and other notable figures will only be delivered to researchers in a photocopy format. Researchers can also access most presidential papers through their published form. See staff for more details. Portions of this collection relating to the Civil War have been digitized and are available to on-site researchers and to users affiliated with subscribing institutions via EBSCOhost.

Lincoln Correspondence

  1. Box 1/Folder 10: Copy of Lincoln's order to form the Army of the Potomac
  2. Box 1/Folder 12: Copy of letter from Sigel to Lincoln
  3. Box 1/Folder 12: Draft of letter from Sigel to Lincoln
  4. Box 1/Folder 12: Draft of letter from Sigel to Lincoln
  5. Box 1/Folder 13: Copy of letter from Sigel to Lincoln
  6. Box 1/Folder 14: Copy of dispatch from President's Office
  7. Box 1/Folder 14: Copy of letter to Lincoln from Offciers of the Eleventh Corps
  8. Box 1/Folder 12: Drafts of letter to Lincoln from Officers of the Eleventh Corps
  9. Box1/Folder 14: Copy of letter to Lincoln from Officers of the 3rd Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry
  10. Box 1/Folder 15: Copy of letter from Sigel to Lincoln
  11. Box 1/Folder 15: Draft of letter from Sigel to Lincoln
  12. Box 1/Folder 15: Draft of letter from Sigel to Lincoln
  13. Box 2/Folder 2: Draft of letter from Sigel to Lincoln
  14. Box 2/ Folder 2: Draft of letter from Sigel to Lincoln
  15. Box 2/ Folder 2: Draft of letter from Sigel to Lincoln

Arrangement Note

This collection is arranged into seven series which are arranged chronologically.

Franz Sigel Papers

  1. Series I: Correspondence
  2. Series II: Legal Documents
  3. Series III: Professional and Political Documents
  4. Series IV: Military Documents
  5. Series V: Writings
  6. Series VI: Clippings, Ephemera, Tributes
  7. Series VII: Family Papers

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Access Points

Subject Names

  • Banks, Nathaniel Prentiss, 1816-1894
  • Burnside, Ambrose Everett, 1824-1881
  • Butz, Caspar, 1825-1885
  • Cesnola, Luigi Palma di, 1832-1904
  • Curtis, Samuel Ryan, 1805-1866
  • Dulon, Rudolph, 1807-1870
  • Frémont, John Charles, 1813-1890
  • Halleck, H. W. (Henry Wager), 1815-1872
  • Pope, John, 1822-1892
  • Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865
  • Schurz, Carl, 1829-1906
  • Sigel, Elsie Dulon
  • Sigel, Moritz, 1788-1863
  • Stahel, Julius, 1825-1912
  • Stanton, Edwin M. (Edwin McMasters), 1814-1869
  • Steinwehr, A. von (Adolph), 1822-1877
  • Weber, Max, 1824-1901
  • Windwart, Heinrich

Document Type

  • Letters (correspondence)
  • Military maps.
  • Military records.

Subject Topics

  • German American soldiers.
  • German Americans -- Missouri -- St. Louis -- History.
  • German Americans -- New York (State) -- New York.
  • Germans -- United States.

Subject Places

  • United States -- Armed Forces -- Officers.
  • New York (State) -- Militia -- Muster rolls.
  • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865.
  • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Participation, German American.

Family Name(s)

  • Sigel family

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Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Open to qualified researchers.

Manuscript items written by U.S. Presidents and other notable figures will only be delivered to researchers in a photocopy format. Researchers can also access most presidential papers through their published form. See staff for more details.

Use Restrictions

Permission to quote from this collection in a publication must be requested and granted in writing. Send permission requests, citing the name of the collection from which you wish to quote to: Manuscript Curator, The New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, New York, NY 10024

Preferred Citation Note

This collection should be cited as the Franz Sigel Papers, MS 565, The New-York Historical Society.

Related Archival Materials Note

The New-York Historical Society also holds a number of civil war maps that Sigel collected, available from the Map Collection.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

The Franz Sigel Papers were given to New-York Historical Society by Mrs. Robert P.J. Barry in 1946. The oversized maps in Series III, Subseries E were gifted from Franz Sigel III in 1985.

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Container List

Series I: Correspondence, 1848-1901, undated

Scope and Content

Within this series, Sigel's correspondence is separated into three subseries, based upon the method of organization. There is a subseries of loose correspondence, numbered correspondence, and bound correspondence. The bulk of this correspondence was written during the American Civil War, although it dates back as far as the 1848 revolution and as far forward as 1901, a year before Sigel's death. There are a number of letters written to President Abraham Lincoln, and a couple with his signature. There does not appear to be a reason why some of this correspondence was numbered, some bound, and others left loose. Many items in this series are written in German.

Subseries I.A: Loose Correspondence, 1848-1901, undated

Scope and Content

This subseries contains correspondence written upon loose pieces of paper. It is organized chronologically and has a number of letters written to Lincoln as well as a few letters with his signature.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 1 Folder : 1 Correspondence
1849-1860
Box: 1 Folder : 2 Correspondence
January-August 1861
Box: 1 Folder : 3 Correspondence
September 1861
Box: 1 Folder : 4 Correspondence
October 1-11, 1861
Box: 1 Folder : 5 Correspondence
October 12-31, 1861
Box: 1 Folder : 6 Correspondence
November 1861
Box: 1 Folder : 7 Correspondence
December 1861
Box: 1 Folder : 8 Correspondence
January-March 1862
Box: 1 Folder : 9 Correspondence
April-May 1862
Box: 1 Folder : 10 Correspondence
June 1862
Box: 1 Folder : 11 Correspondence
July-August 1862
Box: 1 Folder : 12 Correspondence
September 1862
Box: 1 Folder : 13 Correspondence
October 1862
Box: 1 Folder : 14 Correspondence
November-December 1862
Box: 1 Folder : 15 Correspondence
January 1863
Box: 2 Folder : 1 Correspondence
February 1863
Box: 2 Folder : 2 Correspondence
March-July 1863
Box: 2 Folder : 3 Correspondence
August-December 1863
Box: 2 Folder : 4 Correspondence
January-March 1864
Box: 2 Folder : 5 Correspondence
April-December 1864
Box: 2 Folder : 6 Correspondence
1865-1866
Box: 2 Folder : 7 Correspondence
1867-1869
Box: 2 Folder : 8 Correspondence
1870-1871
Box: 2 Folder : 9 Correspondence
1872-1875
Box: 2 Folder : 10 Correspondence
1876-1880
Box: 2 Folder : 11 Correspondence
1881-1886
Box: 2 Folder : 12 Correspondence
1887-1902
Box: 3 Folder : 1 Correspondence
undated
Box: 8 Folder : 1 Correspondence (oversized)
1849-1865

Subseries I.B: Numbered Correspondence, 1861-1862

Scope and Content

The correspondence within this subseries has been numbered, possibly by Sigel as a means of organization. In certain instances, it appears that the numbered progression of correspondence was based on where the correspondence was written. There is a folder within this subseries of numbers that cannot be matched to a particular place or correspondence's numbered progression.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 3 Folder : 2 St. Louis Arsenal (1-47)
May 16-June 11, 1861
Box: 3 Folder : 3 General 1861 (1-50)
May 17-June 28, 1861
Box: 3 Folder : 4 General 1861 (51-102)
June 24-July 8, 1861
Box: 3 Folder : 5 Headquarters Expedition to the South West (1-52)
June 28-July 28, 1861
Box: 3 Folder : 6 Headquarters, Western Department (1-19)
August 15-October 30, 1861
Box: 3 Folder : 7 Unmatched Numbers 1861
May 17-September 18, 1861
Box: 3 Folder : 8 General 1862 (1-60)
January 5-March 12, 1862
Box: 3 Folder : 9 General 1862 (61-99)
March 23-April 3, 1862

Subseries I.C: Bound Correspondence, 1861-1862

Scope and Content

This subseries contains correspondence that has been bound together, possibly for organizational or storage purposes. Within each bound grouping, the correspondence is organization chronologically.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 3 Folder : 10 Letters Written and Received (BI)
May 8-October 26, 1861
Box: 3 Folder : 11 Orders and Instructions Received from Generals Fremont, Hunter, Halleck, and Curtis (EI)
August 26, 1861-January 23, 1862
Box: 3 Folder : 13 Letters Written and Orders Issued by Brigadier General F. Sigel whilst in Command at Rolla (EIII)
December 18-24, 1861
Box: 3 Folder : 14 Letters Sent and Received
January-August 1862
Box: 4 Folder : 1 Letters Written and Issued
August 27, 1861-March 22, 1862
Box: 4 Folder : 2 Brigade Order Book I and Orders of the Department of the West
June 2-July 20, 1861
Box: 4 Folder : 3 Brigade Orders II
July 20-August 26, 1861
Box: 4 Folder : 4 Letters from General Sigel
June 2-August 27, 1861
Box: 4 Folder : 5 Letters and Orders Received by General Sigel, Missouri
June 3-November 6, 1861
Box: 4 Folder : 6 1864 Manifold Writers
June 12-July 7, 1864

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Series II: Legal Documents, 1849-1889, undated

Scope and Content

Within this series are a number of documents both printed and handwritten pertaining to citizenship, the military, and Sigel's position as New York's Pension agent. These materials are in both English and German.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 4 Folder : 7 Legal Documents
1849-1889
Box: 8 Folder : 2 Legal Documents (oversized)
1857-1861, undated

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Series III: Professional and Political Documents, circa 1854-1872

Scope and Content

This series contains materials concerning Sigel's educational, military, and political endeavors. It contains official documents, handwritten notes, and printed materials. This series is in both English and German.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 4 Folder : 8 Professional and Political Documents
c. 1854-c.1872
Box: 8 Folder : 3 Professional Documents (oversized)
1858-1870

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Series IV: Military Documents, 1856-1864, undated

Scope and Content

This series contains materials from Sigel's American military career, starting from his time in the New York militia through to his service as a general in the Civil War. There are maps, notes, roll books, fliers, reports, receipts, and certificates. This series is in English.

Subseries IV.A: New York State Militia Materials, 1856-circa 1858

Scope and Content

Within these subseries are roll books, rosters, notes, fliers, and other information pertaining to Sigel's time in the New York militia. This series is in English.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 4 Folder : 9 New York State Militia
1856-c.1858

Subseries IV.B: Maps, Orders of Battle, and Notes, 1861-1864

Scope and Content

There are maps and other notes concerning military engagements. The maps within this subseries are small in size. This series is in English.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 4 Folder : 10 Civil War Maps, Orders of Battle, Notes
1861-1864
Box: 8 Folder : 4 Civil War Maps, Order of Battle, Notes (oversized)
1849-1864
Box: 8 Folder : 5 Civil War Maps, Diagrams, and Notes, Gathered (oversized) 1887
1861-1887

Subseries IV.C: Reports, 1861-1862

Scope and Content

This series consists of reports and other documents recapping military excursions that took place during the Civil War. This subseries is in English.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 4 Folder : 11 1861 Reports
1861
Box: 4 Folder : 12 Meysenburg Third Volunteer Regiment of Missouri: Enrolling List and Correspondence
1861
Box: 4 Folder : 13 1862 Reports
1862
Box: 5 Folder : 1 Report of the Battle of Pea Ridge, March 6th, 7th, and 8th, 1862
March 1862
Box: 5 Folder : 2 Report of the Battle at Pea Ridge, March 6th, 7th, and 8th, 1862 (copy)
March 1862
Box: 5 Folder : 3 1863-1864 Reports
1863-1864
Box: 5 Folder : 4 Report of the Missouri Expedition, Sterling Price
December 28, 1864
Box: 5 Folder : 5 Reports
no date
Box: 8 Folder : 6 Reports (oversized)
1861-1865

Subseries IV.D: Bills, Receipts, and Certificates, 1861-1864

Scope and Content

Within this subseries are a variety of bills, receipts, and certificates documenting military life during the Civil War. This subseries is in English.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 5 Folder : 6 Bills of the Quartermaster
June-September 1861
Box: 5 Folder : 7 Bills, Receipts, and Certificates
1861-1864

Subseries IV.E: Oversized Maps, 1862-1878, undated

Scope and Content

The oversized maps in this subseries were commissioned specifically by Sigel or document Sigel's campaign. There are four copies of Map of Route and Positions. These maps are stored in an oversized tube in 2NW Unit 5 A-B Top End.

Container 1     Title Date
Oversize: OS Untitled Map of Headquarters
no date
Oversize: OS Topographical Map of the Battlefield of Bull Run relating to the second day's battle fought on August 30th 1862
no date
Oversize: OS Map of N. Eastern Virginia and Vicinity of Washington
August 1862
Oversize: OS Map of Route and Positions: First Corps Army of VA Maj. Gen. Sigel Com. from July 7th to Sept. 10th 1862
September 1862
Oversize: OS Battle Grounds of August 28th, 29th, & 30th 1862 in the Vicinity of Groveton, Prince William, Co., VA
1878

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Series V: Writings, c.1848-1902, undated

Scope and Content

There are a wide variety of topics in this series. Most of the items are handwritten either by Sigel or others and include letters, poems, stories, notes, diaries, and scrapbooks. The materials are in both English and German.

Subseries V.A: Sigel's Writings, circa 1848-1902, undated

Scope and Content

This subseries contains Sigel's own writings on a variety of topics. There is a mixture of both English and German, with the bulk appearing to be German. Within these materials, there are translations, notes, autobiographical information, and diaries and scrapbooks.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 5 Folder : 8 Writings
circa 1848-1850
Box: 5 Folder : 9 Writings
circa 1851-1859
Box: 5 Folder : 10 Writings
circa 1861-1869
Box: 5 Folder : 11 Memorandum Books
1863
Box: 5 Folder : 12 Writings
circa 1870-1879
Box: 5 Folder : 13 Writings
circa 1880-1899
Box: 5 Folder : 14 Biographical Dictation, Henry Irving Dodge
1899
Box: 5 Folder : 15 1848-1849 Revolution in Germany
circa 1880-1890
Box: 5 Folder : 16 Autobiographical
circa 1865-1890
Box: 5 Folder : 17 Teaching German in Public Schools
undated
Box: 5 Folder : 18 Civil War
undated
Box: 6 Folder : 1 Poems and Translations
1855-1901
Box: 6 Folder : 2 Miscellaneous Subjects
undated
Box: 6 Folder : 3 Diaries and Scrapbooks: Diary I
1863-1881
Box: 6 Folder : 4 Diaries and Scrapbooks: Diary II
1881-1901
Box: 6 Folder : 5 Diaries and Scrapbooks: Notices (partial)
1895-1902
Box: 6 Folder : 6 Scrapbooks and Diaries: Diary VII
1901
Box: 8 Folder : 7 Biographical (oversized)
1880

Subseries V.B: Writings, not by Sigel, 1862-1874, undated

Scope and Content

This subseries contains a number of poems, mostly handwritten and in German. There are also odes to Sigel's well known Civil War victory at the Battle of Pea Ridge. There are also a number of letters and other ephemera in a folder of collected works. Some of these items such as the "Citizens and Soldiers' Health" pamphlet give a glimpse of Civil War life.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 6 Folder : 7 "The Battle of Pea Ridge"
undated
Box: 7 Folder : 1 Poems
1862, undated
Box: 7 Folder : 2 Poems
1874, undated
Box: 7 Folder : 3 Collected Works
1861-1865, undated
Box: 8 Folder : 8a "Illustrierte Dorstellung Sudewstlichen Feldzug" George G. Freidlein
undated
Box: 8 Folder : 8b Map for "Illustrierte Dorstellung Sudewstlichen Feldzug"
undated

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Series VI: Clippings, Ephemera, and Tributes, 1855-1930, undated

Scope and Content

Within this series are a number of articles celebrating Sigel, both before and after his death. Several recount his revolutionary history before he came to the United States. There are also many references to what Sigel meant to the German-American community. There are also various pieces of ephemera and envelopes within this series.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 7 Folder : 4 Clippings and Ephemera
1855-1899, undated
Box: 7 Folder : 5 Clippings and Tributes
1902-1930, undated
Box: 7 Folder : 6 Original Envelopes and Wrappers
1861-1864, undated
Box: 7 Folder : 7 Other Envelopes, Wrappers, and Notes
undated
Box: 8 Folder : 9 Clippings (oversized)
1863-1902

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Series VII: Sigel Family Papers, 1806-1915, undated

Scope and Content

Within this series there are three subseries. The documents contained within this series are in both English and German, with the bulk of German in the first two subseries. There are letters, telegrams, and some official documents.

Subseries VII.A: Moritz Sigel Papers, 1806-1859

Scope and Content

Moritz Sigel was Franz Sigel's father. Like Sigel, Moritz took part in the 1848 revolution and had to leave Germany. He managed to escape when the revolution failed and, like his son, went to the United States and settled in New York City. However, just before the outbreak of the American Civil War, Moritz petitioned the Prussians for a pardon and was able to return to Germany in 1859. All of the documents in this subseries are written in German. There appear to be a number of official documents with seals and a diploma. The majority are handwritten documents that appear to be letters and notes.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 7 Folder : 8 Moritz Sigel Papers
1806-1842
Box: 7 Folder : 9 Moritz Sigel Papers
1842-1842
Box: 7 Folder : 10 Moritz Sigel Papers
1851-1859

Subseries VII.B: Elise Sigel Papers, 1861-1910, undated

Scope and Content

This subseries which begins during the American Civil War years and ends in the early twentieth century consists of letters and telegrams. The bulk is letters, and those letters are mostly written in German. There are some notable exceptions when the correspondence is in English. Those instances are typically condolence letters or telegrams after Sigel died in 1902.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 7 Folder : 11 Correspondence
1861-1862
Box: 7 Folder : 12 Correspondence
1863-1865
Box: 7 Folder : 13 Correspondence
1866-1901
Box: 7 Folder : 14 Correspondence
1902-1910, undated

Subseries VII.C: Other Family Papers, 1900-1915

Scope and Content

Within this subseries are Franz Sigel Jr.'s papers and other family correspondence. Franz Sigel Jr.'s papers consist mainly of telegrams telling of his father's deteriorating health and then ones conveying condolences. There is also a letter from the Gen. Franz Sigel Monument Committee. The other family correspondence contains only a few documents which are written in German.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 7 Folder : 15 Franz Sigel Jr. Papers
1902-1905
Box: 7 Folder : 16 Family Correspondence
1900-1915

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