Deception for Journalism's Sake: A Database

Deception for Journalism's Sake: A Database

The work of groups such as James O'Keefe's Project Veritas and Lila Rose's LiveAction and their undercover operations.

These are examples of undercover reportage that were considered to have crossed ethical lines or that caused major legal wrangles.

Journalists who infiltrated U.S.-based Nazi bunds, the Ku Klux Klan, the Gomorrah, and other secret societies and closed groups.

Reporters encounter or inhabit the lives of very hard-laboring others.

Reporters have taken the undercover route from slaughterhouses and chicken- and pork-processing plants to fast-food chains and supermarkets to understand the system.

Journalists from the United States and Australia get inside the post-Civil War practice of recruiting Pacific Islanders to work the world's non-U.S. plantations on extended contracts of indenture.

Reporters have worked as guards or gotten themselves arrested -- sometimes with the aid of authorities and sometimes without -- to investigate conditions inside prisons and jails.

Medicare and Medicaid fraud have been perennial reporting topics since the 1960s, often requiring undercover techniques to amass specific details.