Deception for Journalism's Sake: A Database

Deception for Journalism's Sake: A Database

Across the world, journalists have used undercover techniques to expose individual predators and as well as major sex crime rings.

These are stings to expose scam artists, quacks and hucksters who prey on the needs or naivete of their customers, clients, or patients.

Since the 1870s, journalists have been posing as patients or attendants to expose horrid conditions and treatment inside mental hospitals. Nellie Bly, incidentally, was not the first. 

 An undercover investigation by the Financial Times of behavior toward hostesses at The Presidents Club's annual men-only charity event in London and reaction to the story. 

Among the most common of poses: journalists who elect to live as tramps, the homeless, or the abject poor.

Medicare and Medicaid fraud have been perennial reporting topics since the 1960s, often requiring undercover techniques to amass specific details.

Journalism that required costuming or even physical transformation by reporters reporting on racial, ethnic, gender or social groups not their own.

Reporters have worked as migrant laborers and shadowed undocumented workers crossing the border into the United States.