Ella Baker

Ella Baker
Marvel Cooke
From the magazine: "In the Bronx, northern borough of New York City, known for its heavy Jewish population, exists a street corner market for domestic servants where Negro women are 'rented' for unbelievably low rates for housework."
Last in Marvel Cooke's five-part series for The New York Compass on the Bronx slave mart.
Marvel Cooke
Some ideas from the Domestic Workers Union for suppressing the resurgence of the "slave markets" of the Bronx, Brighton Beach, Brownsville and elsewhere -- street corners where women domestic workers had again begun gathering in 1950 to see day labor because full-time jobs had become difficult to find.
Part four in Marvel Cooke's five-part series for the New York Compass in 1950 on the Bronx "slave mart," where women domestics went to find jobs as day laborers.
Marvel Cooke
Part four of Marvel Cooke's five-part series for the New York Compass on the "Bronx slave mart," where women unable to find full-time employment sought day labor as domestics. The series reprised the ruse Cooke and Ella Baker perpetrated for The Crisis, published in its November 1935 issue.
Part three in Marvel Cooke's five-part series for the New York Compass in 1950 on the domestic day labor market in the Bronx
Marvel Cooke
Part three of Marvel Cooke's five-part series on the Bronx "slave mart," where she posed as a day laborer seeking domestic work and learned about the ways employers had to cheat the workers out of already paltry full pay promised.
Part two in a five-part series in the New York Compass on Marvel Cooke's experiences posing as a domestic day laborer.
Marvel Cooke
In this second part of Marvel Cooke's five-part series on the Bronx slave mart, she describes the double threat for women forced to find employment as day laborers as full-time domestic jobs dried up -- preyed on by women seeking cheap domestic help by the day and harassed and solicited by men with other interests.
Syndicate content