factory girls

Eva Gay's Visit to the Girl Workers in Minneapolis Shirt Factories; Some of the Dark, Dank and Disagreeable Shops of the Shirt Workers; Girls Must Furnish Their Own Machines, as Well as the Sewing Materials; Starvation Wages for Hard Work--Girls Terrorized by Their Taskmasters.
Eva Gay
Gay wrote a series of articles on posing as a factory worker to assess conditions in Minnesota with a pledge to "ferret out every wrong and hardship."
Eva Gay's Trip Through Bag and Mattress Factories of Minneapolis; Sewing Mid Clouds of Dust--Hardships Hand in Hand With Small Wages; Employers Who Provide Necessary Conveniences and Others Who Do Not; Girls Compelled to "Stand for Their Health" -- Mattress Works Employes
Eva Gay
Gay wrote a series of articles on posing as a factory worker to assess conditions in Minnesota with a pledge to "ferret out every wrong and hardship."
Lucy Hosmer
An undercover expose of life for the working women of the shoe factories of St. Louis, under the direction of Charles Chapin, who favored the method at every newspaper he edited.
"Experiences of a Literary Woman as a Working Girl"
Bessie (Mrs. John) van Vorst
Marie van Vorst
Final part of the series by the sisters-in-law van Vorst investigating how women of the other half live and work.
William Hard
Rheta Childe Dorr
Part III of the series on women at work in the first decade of the twentieth century, a topic <em>Everybody's</em> revisited several times during the period and favored undercover investigations as the technique of choice.
William Hard
Rheta Childe Dorr
Part III of the series on women at work in the first decade of the twentieth century, a topic <em>Everybody's</em> revisited several times during the period and favored undercover investigations as the technique of choice.
William Hard
Rheta Childe Dorr
Part III of the series on women at work in the first decade of the twentieth century in <em>Everybody's</em>, a topic the magazine revisited several times during the period and favored undercover investigations as the technique of choice.
"Being the Experiences of a Literary Woman as a Working Girl"
Marie van Vorst
Marie van Vorst's experiences posing as a worker in a southern mill for a five-part series in Everybody's Magazine, written with her sister-in-law, Bessie van Vorst.
"Being the Experiences of Two Gentlewomen as Factory Girls"
Bessie (Mrs. John) van Vorst
Bessie van Vorst working undercover in a knitting mill at Perry, New York for a five-part series in Everybody's about the lives of factory girls.
"Experiences of a Literary Woman as a Working Girl"
Marie van Vorst
Marie van Vorst at work in a Lynn, Massachusetts shoe factory under the name of Belle Ballard for "The Woman That Toils," a series for Everybody's Magazine produced by Marie and her sister-in-law, Bessie (Mrs. John) van Vorst. The series was presented as an act of class transvestitism and Marie described as the daughter of the late Judge van Vorst, a chancellor of the State of New York, president of the Century Club and founder of the Holland Society.
"Pantry Girl in a New York Hotel"
Cornelia Stratton Parker
"No. 1075 packs chocolates"
Cornelia Stratton Parker
Parker's 1921 six-part series for Harper's, later collected into a book published by Harper & Brothers, examining conditions for the working woman by posing herself in a variety of low-wage jobs, a ruse repeated numerous times since the 1880s by a number of female journalists, among them, Nell Nelson, the Van Vorst sisters-in-law, and Emmeline Pendennis.
Will Christian Churches Help Them?; Dealing With a Crying Evil; Cannot Women Organize
A collection of clippings from newspapers published in The Tribune reacting to Helen Campbell's series about New York's working women titled "Prisoners of Poverty."
Discussion Aroused By Her Articles on "Prisoner's Of Poverty"
This article contains the responses of prominent New York clergyman Rev. Dr. Thomas Armitage, Rev. Dr. Howard Crosby and Rev. Dr. Edward McGlynn. to Campbell's "Prisoners of Poverty" series in The New York Tribune. The author seems to suggests that working women are partly to blame for their own exploitation.
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