Food Lion

Daniel A. Levin
Alan C. Roline
Does reporting undercover and lying about your identity constitute fraud? This article covers the Food Lion controversy in detail.
Clarence Page
A Clarence Page column bemoaning the possible fate of undercover reporting in light of Food Lion and other scandals.
Edward Wasserman
Ed Wasserman describes the changes happening within the art of investigative reporting by giving a few examples.
Michael A. Cooper
Michael A. Cooper's letter to the editor of The New York Times in response to Paul Starobin's article on the expose of Food Lion. Starobin's original article can be found at: http://www.deseretnews.com/article/542107/WHEN-INVESTIGATIVE-JOURNALISM-TURNS-SHODDY.html
Diane Sawyer
Original Broadcast of the Food Lion segment on ABC's Prime Time Live, November 5, 1992.
"Debate over lying to get a story has intensified in the wake of the Food Lion case. Defenders say deception sometimes is critical in reporting important stories. But a mounting chorus of criticism decries the practice as overdone, bad for journalism's credibility - and just plain wrong."
Susan Paterno
A critique of undercover reporting, using the Tony Horwitz "9 to Nowhere" series of 1994 in the Wall Street Journal and the ABC "Prime Time Live" undercover segment on the Food Lion supermarket chain to discuss examine the various issues and conflicting points of view.
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