lived as

Ted Conover
As a senior at Amherst college, Conover rode freight trains in the guise of a tramp for his senior thesis in anthropology. This piece for the Amherst alumni magazine is based on that research, describing a morning spent with "Pops," a 61-year-old man Conover lived with for a week.
Mozart-Playing New Yorker Learns a Secret and Laughs
Neil Henry
This final article in the "Down & Out" series is a profile of Allie, a bright, multilingual young man Henry met in Washington who came to discover the reporter's true identity.
Neil Henry
In the second to last installment of the "Down & Out" series, Neil Henry writes about the strategies and cons of Washington D.C.'s most prolific panhandlers.
Neil Henry
In the tenth article in the series "Down & Out," Henry reveals all the different ways D.C.'s homeless make ends meet, from scavenging to panhandling and scamming.
Neil Henry
In the ninth article in the series "Down & Out," Henry spends a night on heating vent in downtown D.C., only to be kept awake by countless rats and the verbal abuse of well-to-do concertgoers passing by.
Neil Henry
Neil Henry arrives in Washington D.C. from Baltimore and soon realizes that he must constantly guard against scams and carefully avoid altercations with the hard-nosed D.C. homeless.
Neil Henry
In the seventh installment of his "Down & Out" series for The Washington Post, Neil Henry writes about the night he spent at the Bethesda Community Crisis Center and Carl, a young man he met there.
Neil Henry
Neil Henry writes about the challenges of finding shelter on a freezing night in suburban Baltimore.
Neil Henry
Neil Henry describes how the bums at Helping-Up mission let loose at the Edison hotel and frequent local peep shows when they earn some money.
Neil Henry
In the fourth article in "Down & Out" series, Henry writes about Johnny, a dignified man who helped him secure a job as a paper-boy.
Neil Henry
In the third article in "Down & Out," Henry writes about the difficulties of finding work for Baltimore's homeless.
Street People Share Secrets of Survival
Neil Henry
In this second article in his "Down & Out" series, reporter Neil Henry writes about his daily routine while living at Baltimore's Helping-Up mission.
Neil Henry
In this first installment of Neil Henry's series "Down & Out" where he lived as a bum in Baltimore and Washington, he reports on the people he met at Baltimore's Helping-Up Mission.
Tenant Rights Lost in Ignorance
Woody Klein
In the sixth installment of the "I Lived in a Slum" series, Woody Klein reports that despite living in terrible conditions, the residents of New York City's slums are largely unaware of the housing laws aimed to guarantee them a basic standard of living.
At the End of the Road - Welfare
Woody Klein
In the fifth installment of the "I Lived in a Slum" series, Woody Klein writes about his experience trying to receive welfare aid during the month he spent living in New York City's worst slums.
'We Ain't Alive, Just Hangin' On'
Woody Klein
In this third installment of the "I Lived in a Slum" series, staff writer Woody Klein reports on his experience living in a slum in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. This is where he met Old Sam and his wife, who lived in a closet-sized room in the basement of his apartment building.
Tenants Battle to Survive in Lower East Side's 'Korea'
Woody Klein
In this second installment of the "I Lived in a Slum" series, Woody Klein writes about his experience living in a tenement in the Lower East Side's "Korea" neighborhood and Francisco, a tenant he met while living there.
Frankly, We're Shocked Too!
Unsigned
The New York World-Telegram and Sun's editorial board reacts to staff writer Woody Klein's series "I Lived in a Slum," expressing shock that even in a modern city like New York, so many of its residents live in substandard conditions.
Bugs Reign in Squalor
Woody Klein
In this fourth installment of the "I Lived in a Slum" series, New York World-Telegram and Sun reporter Woody Klein reports on his first experience living in a New York City slum - a roach-infested tenement building on W. 84th Street.
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