low-wage earners

"Naval Stores Ages-Old, but Few Like Living in the Past"
Chester Goolrick
Paul Lieberman
Naval stores are the ingredients used in scores of products "from paint thinner and wood stains to medicated soaps and liquid floor wax."
"Jim Palmer: He Recalls Bad Days in the Woods"
Chester Goolrick
Paul Lieberman
Profile of Jim Palmer, who recalls life as a worker in the turpentine woods.
"L.D. Davis: 'Boss Had The Pencil'"
Chester Goolrick
Paul Lieberman
Profile of L.D.Davis, one of the turpentine laborers, who got out of the "web of work" to be "his own man" through a system known as "halfing."
Lucy Hosmer
An undercover expose of life for the working women of the shoe factories of St. Louis, under the direction of Charles Chapin, who favored the method at every newspaper he edited.
"The Evolution of a Jacket"
Helen Campbell
In the ninth chapter of her "Prisoners of Poverty" series, Campbell describes how jacket makers did "piece-work," meaning women had to work from home with their own equipment, making just one part of each jacket. This way manufacturers, in addition to paying low wages, saved on rent and equipment too.
"The True Story of Lotte Bauer"
Helen Campbell
Campbell tells the story of Lotte, a young Prussian immigrant who moves with her family to New York City. When her brother gets paralyzed on the job, Lotte tries to make ends meet with her sewing. She fails to make enough money and her family falls into destitution.
"Negative or Positive Gospel"
Helen Campbell
In this "Prisoners of Povert" column, Helen Campbell criticizes the Church for failing to acknowledge, let alone advocate for the city's poor. She assures the reader that New York's poor are very real and goes on to tell the story of a young mother struggling to support her sick husband and children by working in underwear manufacturing.
"More Methods of Prosperous Firms"
Helen Campbell
In the sixth installment of "Prisoners of Poverty," Campbell continues her Marxist critique of the garment manufacturing industry. She describes how competitionsbetween and within manufacturers contributes to low wages, long hours and poor conditions for the working poor, especially women.
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