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Nellie Bly Contradicts a Recent Article in The Sun; She Gives Many Additional Facts About Her Remarkable Sojourn on Blackwell's Island; More Praise for Dr. Ingram; He Is the Right Man in the Right Place; The Other Doctors Heartless and Careless
Nellie Bly
When Kevin Heldman went undercover at Woodhull’s psychiatric unit, he wanted to experience how low-income people were treated. In 179 hours as a mental patient, he found little care and even less comfort.
Kevin Heldman
From the City Limits blurb: "When Kevin Heldman went undercover at Woodhull's psychiatric unit, he wanted to experience how low-income people were treated." (All names and some identifying characteristics of patients were changed for publication. Heldman explains that "none of the officials or experts interviewed or quoted in the article were aware that I had been in a psychiatric ward as a reporter."
Rosenzweig the Abortionist - His Fruitless Attempts to Get out on Bail
Augustus St. Clair
Later Developments in Regard to the Trunk Tragedy. Important Admissions of Rosenzweig's Servant. All Doubt of the Identity of the Victim Removed. Sketch of the Life of Miss Alice Bowlby. Suicide at Paterson, N.J., of Her Supposed Destroyer. The Brooklyn Abortionists Held for Examination.
Augustus St. Clair
Satisfactory Progress in Developing the Trunk Mystery. Discovery of the Truckman Through the Published Accounts. ARREST OF THE ABORTIONIST. Sketch of the Prisoner and His Infamous Career. All Efforts to Identify the Victim Unavailing. THE TRUCKMAN FOUND AT LAST. PICKET'S STORY. KOSENZWEIG'S ARREST EFFECTED.. THE TRUCKMAN MAKES A DETAILED STATEMENT. ROSENZWEIG INTERROGATED SEEKING TO IDENTIFY THE VICTIM.
Augustus St. Clair
Augustus St. Clair
St. Clair and a lady friend pose as a couple in search of someone to perform an abortion in an undercover expose of the trade.
Dale Brazao
Moira Welsh
Dale Brazao went undercover for a week to live in a Toronto retirement home to expose hideous conditions.
Nellie Bly
Bly gives the back story of her madhouse expose.
Helen Zia
Helen Zia goes undercover for Ms. Magazine to investigate the sweatshops of San Francisco that employ Asian-American women workers.
"Week in Sweatshop Reveals Grim Conspiracy of the Poor"
Jane H. Lii
Lii spends a week as a Chinatown sweatshop worker.
Matt Taibbi
The article is also Chapter Three of Taibbi's book, "The Great Derangement" (see page)
Charles Howe
Howe describes his experience posing as/working as part of this investigation as guard at San Quentin.
Charles Howe
Howe describes conditions for the 655 women in prison at the California Institute for Women near Chino, the state's only women's facility.
Charles Howe
An overview of the California prison system, which, at the time was the world's 3rd largest after China and the Soviet Union.
Eva Gay's Trip Through Bag and Mattress Factories of Minneapolis; Sewing Mid Clouds of Dust--Hardships Hand in Hand With Small Wages; Employers Who Provide Necessary Conveniences and Others Who Do Not; Girls Compelled to "Stand for Their Health" -- Mattress Works Employes
Eva Gay
Gay wrote a series of articles on posing as a factory worker to assess conditions in Minnesota with a pledge to "ferret out every wrong and hardship."
Lucy Hosmer
An undercover expose of life for the working women of the shoe factories of St. Louis, under the direction of Charles Chapin, who favored the method at every newspaper he edited.
"Louisiana Labor Camps Supply 'Warm Bodies' The Oil Business Needs; Laborers Often Earn Little Beyond Debt to a Camp; Life at a Halfway House; Some Citizens Defend System""
George Getschow
Part Two of George Getschow's "Dirty Work" series for the Wall Street Journal for which he lived and worked among oil industry day laborers. The series was a Pulitzer finalist in 1984.
"The Day Laborer's Toil Is Hard, Pay Minimal, Security Nonexistent; In Houston, the Jobless Fill Labor Pools That Retake Part of Each Day's Wage; The System at Krash Cabin"
George Getschow
Getschow lives the life of a day laborer in this,, part one of a two-part series for the Wall Street Journal, a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 1983.
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