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The Final Days in Jail
Richard H. Stewart
In the final installment of his series "Doing Time" for the Boston Globe, R.H. Stewart describes in detail the group alcohol counselling sessions he was required to attend as part of his sentence as well as the humiliation he felt when his wife visited. Finally, he reveals the mixed reactions of the other inmates when he reveals his true identity and purpose of his incarceration.
Jail Boredom Biggest Hassle
Richard H. Stewart
In the fourth installment of Stewart's "Doing Time" series for the Boston Globe, he describes the challenge of finding something to do to pass the time while in jail. The article also includes a description of the mandatory group counselling sessions and a poem written by a 29-year-old inmate serving time for breaking and entering.
Rules to Learn; Cigarettes are Money
Richard H. Stewart
Boston Globe reporter Richard Stewart went undercover as a prison inmate and served six days in a Salem jail for a phony DUI conviction. This is the third of his five part series titled "Doing Time" where he describes his interactions with the other inmates and how he discovered the prison's unspoken rules.
The Cell Block; Life in a Barren 5-by-8 Space
R. H. Stewart
Boston Globe reporter Richard Stewart went undercover as a prison inmate and served six days in a Salem jail for a phony DUI conviction. This is the second of his five part series titled "Doing Time" where he describes his fears about getting along with the other inmates and spending his first night in a jail cell.
The First Day; Dignity Leaves and Fear Arrives
Richard H Stewart
Boston Globe reporter Richard Stewart went undercover as a prison inmate and served six days in a Salem jail for a phony DUI conviction. This is the first of his five part series titled "Doing Time" where he describes his transportation and entrance to the jail.
John S Long
Long posed as a corrections officer at Fort Grant Correctional and Training Center for two weeks directly following his honeymoon in Tahiti. At Fort Grant he dealt with all types of inmates, from gang members to rapists and murderers.
R H Ring
Arizona Daily Star reporter R.H. Ring spent 10 days posing as a maximum-security convict at Arizona's Florence State Penitentiary. Very few people in the prison system knew of his stay, not even Florence's warden. This article won an award from Investigative Reports and Editors (IRE) and an American Bar Association Gavel Award. It was published in a tabloid called "The Convicted" as a special supplement to the Ariozona Daily Star, along with other Star reporters' stories on Arizona's corrections system. Ring's colleague John Long posed as a corrections officer. His story "Holding Down the Fort" was also included in "The Convicted."
Further Interesting Incidents of the Execution
A detailed account of the execution of John Brown (it even includes a diagram of the gallows) by "a Special Correspondent," later revealed to be the Tribune's New-York-based junior agricultural editor Henry S. Olcott. He gained access to the execution by volunteering for a Virginia militia charged with guarding Brown's body.
This article reports of an undercover sting by the New York City Police against the city's fifty or so astrologists and fortunetellers, whose crimes ranged from extortion to child prostitution. Some of these women were profiled the previous year in the Tribune's "Witches of New-York" series written by humorist Mortimer Thomson under his pseudonym Doesticks.
Mrs. Pugh. No.102 South First street, Williamsburgh
Q.K. Philander Doesticks, P.B.
The sixteenth and final article in The New York Tribune's series about astrologers and fortunetellers titled "The Witches of New-York," all written by humorist Mortimer Thomson under his pseudonym "Doesticks."
Mrs. Grommer. No.34 N. Second street, Williamsburgh
Q. K. Philander Doesticks, P.B.
The fifteenth article in The New York Tribune's series about astrologers and fortunetellers titled "The Witches of New-York," all written by humorist Mortimer Thomson under his pseudonym "Doesticks."
Ms. Fleury. No.263 Broome street
Q.K. Philander Doesticks, P.B.
The fourteenth article in The New York Tribune's series about astrologers and fortunetellers titled "The Witches of New-York," all written by humorist Mortimer Thomson under his pseudonym "Doesticks."
Madame Harris. No.80 West Nineteenth street, near Sixth avenue
Q.K. Philander Doesticks, P.B.
The thirteenth article in The New York Tribune's series about astrologers and fortunetellers titled "The Witches of New-York," all written by humorist Mortimer Thomson under his pseudonym "Doesticks."
Madame Carzo, the Brazilian Astrologist. No.151 Bowery
Q.K. Philander Doesticks, P.B.
The twelfth article in The New York Tribune's series about astrologers and fortunetellers titled "The Witches of New-York," all written by humorist Mortimer Thomson under his pseudonym "Doesticks."
Mrs. Hayes Clairvoyant. No.176 Grand street
Q.K. Philander Doesticks, P.B.
The eleventh article in The New York Tribune's series about astrologers and fortunetellers titled "The Witches of New-York," all written by humorist Mortimer Thomson under his pseudonym "Doesticks."
Madame Clifton. No.185 Orchard street, Near Stanton
Q.K. Philander Doesticks, P.B.
The tenth article in The New York Tribune's series about astrologers and fortunetellers titled "The Witches of New-York," all written by humorist Mortimer Thomson under his pseudonym "Doesticks."
A Wizard – Dr. Wilson. No.172 Delancey street
Q.K. Philander Doesticks, P.B.
The ninth article in The New York Tribune's series about astrologers and fortunetellers titled "The Witches of New-York," all written by humorist Mortimer Thomson under his pseudonym "Doesticks."
Madame Morrow. No.76 Broome street, near Columbia
Q.K. Philander Doesticks, P.B.
The eighth article in The New York Tribune's series about astrologers and fortunetellers titled "The Witches of New-York," all written by humorist Mortimer Thomson under his pseudonym "Doesticks."
Mrs. Seymour, Clairvoyant No.110 Spring street, near Mercer
Q.K. Philander Doesticks, P.B.
Seventh article in the Tribune's funny "Witches of New-York" series by renowned humorist Mortimer Thomson (a.k.a. Doesticks).
The Gipsy Girl No. 207 Third Avenue, between Eighteenth and Nineteenth-sts
Q.K. Philander Doesticks, P.B.
The sixth article in the Tribune's "The Witches of New-York" series, written by acclaimed humorist Mortimer Thomson under his pseudonym Doesticks Philander.
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