undercover

James O'Keefe
Part three of O'Keefe's video series on NPR, focusing on funding.
James O'Keefe
The first part of a secretly taped conversation (edited, presented in three parts by James O'Keefe) with NPR's former Foundation President Ron Schiller (who resigned as a result of this video).
James O'Keefe
Hannah Giles
This two-part undercover video at the San Diego ACORN office, along with the San Bernadino tapes, prompted Gov. Schwarzenegger to ask the state's Atty. General Jerry Brown to investigate the group. After obtaining the unedited tapes, Brown found no violation of criminal laws. The report did, however, find possible violations of state civil laws.
James O'Keefe
Hannah Giles
Undercover video shot in the Brooklyn ACORN office. The Brooklyn DA investigated the possible criminal activity indicated by these videos, but cleared the organization of wrongdoing after viewing the unedited version of these tapes.
James O'Keefe
Hannah Giles
A two-part video filmed undercover at ACORN D.C.
James O'Keefe
Hannah Giles
The two-part undercover video shot in a Baltimore ACORN office.
James O'Keefe
Hannah Giles
This two-part undercover video at the San Bernadino ACORN office, along with the San Diego tapes, prompted Gov. Schwarzenegger to ask the state's Atty. General Jerry Brown to investigate the group. After obtaining the unedited tapes, Brown found no violation of criminal laws. The report did, however, find possible violations of state civil laws. The ACORN employee who claimed to have killed her husband, Tresa Kaelke, was (according to the AG's report) deliberately saying shocking, untrue, things after catching on to O'Keefe's scheme.
Will the last body dragged out the radio network's front door please turn off the lights?
Jack Shafer
Shafer looks at the aftermath of the undercover O'Keefe video with an NPR development executive.
Secret recordings like the ones that took down NPR's Ron Schiller and embarrassed Republican Gov. Scott Walker signal a disturbing move away from transparency in news gathering.
James Rainey
Rainey frames the O'Keefe undercover reports as a cautionary tale, and an indication of a sea change in journalistic transparency.
The full 2-hour video of Project Veritas's undercover conversation with NPR's Ron Schiller.
James O'Keefe calls himself a progressive radical and an investigative journalist without formal training. ACORN's tactics had made him angry, he says.
An interview/profile of O'Keefe after the ACORN sting.
Mozart-Playing New Yorker Learns a Secret and Laughs
Neil Henry
This final article in the "Down & Out" series is a profile of Allie, a bright, multilingual young man Henry met in Washington who came to discover the reporter's true identity.
Neil Henry
In the second to last installment of the "Down & Out" series, Neil Henry writes about the strategies and cons of Washington D.C.'s most prolific panhandlers.
Neil Henry
In the tenth article in the series "Down & Out," Henry reveals all the different ways D.C.'s homeless make ends meet, from scavenging to panhandling and scamming.
Neil Henry
In the ninth article in the series "Down & Out," Henry spends a night on heating vent in downtown D.C., only to be kept awake by countless rats and the verbal abuse of well-to-do concertgoers passing by.
Neil Henry
Neil Henry arrives in Washington D.C. from Baltimore and soon realizes that he must constantly guard against scams and carefully avoid altercations with the hard-nosed D.C. homeless.
Neil Henry
In the seventh installment of his "Down & Out" series for The Washington Post, Neil Henry writes about the night he spent at the Bethesda Community Crisis Center and Carl, a young man he met there.
Neil Henry
Neil Henry writes about the challenges of finding shelter on a freezing night in suburban Baltimore.
Why did this $105,000-a-year lawyer from Harvard go to work as a $7-an-hour busboy at the Greenwich Country Club — and what did he find?
Lawrence Otis Graham
Lawrence Graham, a Harvard alum and lawyer, goes to work as a busboy in a Greenwich country club.
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