undercover

Why did this $105,000-a-year lawyer from Harvard go to work as a $7-an-hour busboy at the Greenwich Country Club — and what did he find?
Lawrence Otis Graham
Lawrence Graham, a Harvard alum and lawyer, goes to work as a busboy in a Greenwich country club.
Neil Henry
Neil Henry describes how the bums at Helping-Up mission let loose at the Edison hotel and frequent local peep shows when they earn some money.
Neil Henry
In the fourth article in "Down & Out" series, Henry writes about Johnny, a dignified man who helped him secure a job as a paper-boy.
Neil Henry
In the third article in "Down & Out," Henry writes about the difficulties of finding work for Baltimore's homeless.
Street People Share Secrets of Survival
Neil Henry
In this second article in his "Down & Out" series, reporter Neil Henry writes about his daily routine while living at Baltimore's Helping-Up mission.
Neil Henry
In this first installment of Neil Henry's series "Down & Out" where he lived as a bum in Baltimore and Washington, he reports on the people he met at Baltimore's Helping-Up Mission.
How Tribune Got Vote Fraud Story
William Currie
The Tribune reports on the experiences of reporter William Mullen, who pieced together evidence of vote fraud while working undercover as a Republican clerk in the Chicago Board of Election Commissioners office,
George Bliss
Pamela Zekman
In a press conference, chairman of the Chicago Board of Election Comissioners Stanley Kusper accused William Mullen, the reporter who worked undercover as a clerk in Kusper's office, of breaking the law because he technically held another job while collecting $20-a-day as a clerk, which is forbidden under Illinois election law.
Pamela Zekman
Upon Task Force reporter William Mullen's return to the Board of Election Commissioners office, where he previously worked undercover as a clerk, chairman Stanley Kusper denies Mullen access to voter records.
John Elmer
This article the the Chicago Tribune press service reports on the reaction of Illinois governor Ogilvie to the Tribune's voter fraud investigation.
William Mullen
George Bliss
In another follow-up article at the irregularities in the certification of Republican poll judges, who must have Republic voting records, the Tribune Task Force reveals paperwork that proves that many of the so-called "Republican" judges have markedly democratic voting records.
George Bliss
William Currie
This article reveals how 22 Better Government Association members and Tribune Reporters applied to be Republican poll judges for the March primary election. Virtually all applications were denied. Those who were certified as poll judges were turned away by Democratic party officials at the polls.
George Bill
William Mullen
The Task Force reports that instead of official Republican election judges controlling the poling places for election fraud, Democratic party officials bar the Republican officials from accessing their polls.
William Mullen
Written in the first person, Task Force reporter William Mullen describes how he infiltrated the office of Stanley Kusper, the commissioner of the Board of Election, and uncovered evidence of large scale election fraud.
George Bliss
William Mullen
The first article in the Tribune Task Force's lengthy investigation into election fraud in the March 21 primary election. William Mullen, a Task Force member, worked under at the Chicago Board of Election Commissioner's City Hall offices, where he used his access to public records to gather evidence of the fraud.
Ben H. Bagdikian
The third article in the Shame of Prisons series examines the conditions of jails for those who can't post bail and the bureaucracy of designing, running, and building prisons.
Tenant Rights Lost in Ignorance
Woody Klein
In the sixth installment of the "I Lived in a Slum" series, Woody Klein reports that despite living in terrible conditions, the residents of New York City's slums are largely unaware of the housing laws aimed to guarantee them a basic standard of living.
At the End of the Road - Welfare
Woody Klein
In the fifth installment of the "I Lived in a Slum" series, Woody Klein writes about his experience trying to receive welfare aid during the month he spent living in New York City's worst slums.
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