volunteered as

C. J. Chivers
In the aftermath of the 9-11 attack in New York, C.J. Chivers found a way to remain on site at the chasm that was the World Trade Center for 12 more days -- by finding a cart and hauling garbage, a job no one wanted to do.
"Jan in the North"
Helen Campbell
Campbell describes her encounter with a Finnish immigrant and his culture in the Cherry Street tenements of Lower Manhattan. Campbell's articles published in Lippincott's Magazine, along with those from Sunday Afternoon, were reprinted in a book titled "The Problem of the Poor" (1888).
"Diet and Its Doings"
Helen Campbell
Half academic and half ethnographic, in this article Campbell writes about the role of nutrition and welfare of New York's poor. She recounts her visit to a tenement kitchen where the women have barely rudimentary cooking skills. Campbell's articles published in Lippincott's Magazine, along with those from Sunday Afternoon, were reprinted in a book titled "The Problem of the Poor " (1888).
"Nan; Or, A Girl's Life"
Helen Campbell
Campbell tells the story of Nan, a girl who was kidnapped and sold by her drunkard father when she was just a baby. Campbell's articles published in Lippincott's Magazine, along with those from Sunday Afternoon, were reprinted in a book titled "The Problem of the Poor " (1888).
"Jerry"
Helen Campbell
Campbell's second article in the series "Studies in the Slums" tells the story of Jerry, a bird-collector and reformed ex-convict that lives in the Water Street tenements. Told from Jerry's point of view, the article gives an account of his life and imprisonment and his ultimate reform and conversion to Christianity. Campbell's articles published in Lippincott's Magazine, along with those from Sunday Afternoon, were reprinted in a book titled "The Problem of the Poor " (1888).
"Water Street and Its Work"
Helen Campbell
In this first installment of her "Studies in the Slums" series, Campbell engages in a type of Socratic dialogue with an upper-class New Yorker she calls Criticus about whether or not reform is possible in New York's poorest tenements. While he believes it is impossible, Campbell tries to prove him wrong by showing him examples of reformed, upstanding residents who lead "good" lives, despite their poor living conditions. Campbell's articles published in Lippincott's Magazine, along with those from Sunday Afternoon, were reprinted in a book titled "The Problem of the Poor" (1888). This series, along with Campbell's writings for the magazine Sunday Afternoon, are collected in her book titled "The Problem of the Poor."
Helen Campbell
Campbell relays her conversation with Max, a lifelong resident of the Lower Manhattan's tenements. Campbell's articles published in Sunday Afternoon, along with those in Lippincott's Magazine, were reprinted in a book titled "The Problem of the Poor" (1888).
Helen Campbell
In this article, Campbell takes it upon herself to teach the daughters of a family how to cook a high quality, but inexpensive meal. Campbell's articles published in Sunday Afternoon magazine were later collected, along with those from Lippincott's Magazine, in a book titled "Problems of the Poor" (1888).
Helen Campbell
In this article, Campbell discusses the housing conditions and crime rampant in the tenements of Lower Manhattan with some of the residents who live there, including Jerry and Old Padgett, two characters who appear repeatedly in her vignettes of the inner-city. Campbell ends her piece by calling for a hands-on, service oriented approach to Christianity, denouncing its "dead doctrines" that do nothing to improve the conditions of the city's poor. Campbell's articles published in Sunday Afternoon magazine were later collected, along with those from Lippincott's Magazine, in a book titled "The Problem of the Poor" (1888).
Helen Campbell
This article recounts a meeting between a group of New York City's social reformers as they discuss how to best to deal with the problem of tenements. Campbell engages in debate with a person she calls "The Bachelor," who believes that the responsibility lies with the property owners and architects to design and administer humane housing to the city's poor. Campbell, on the other hand, believes that the legislators of New York must pass new housing and sanitary laws. Campbell's articles published in Sunday Afternoon, along with those in Lippincott's Magazine, were reprinted in a book titled "The Problem of the Poor" (1888).
Helen Campbell
A continuation of Campbell's January article in Sunday Afternoon, where she recounts her experience spending a Sunday afternoon in the tenements of Lower Manhattan. In this installment, Campbell meets Jerry the bird collector and accompanies a man as he visits his dying mother. Campbell's articles published in Sunday Afternoon were later collected, along with those from Lippincott's Magazine, in a book titled "The Problem of the Poor" (1888).
Helen Campbell
This article consists of Campbell's ethnographic account of one particular Sunday afternoon she spent in the tenements of Water Street, one of the oldest and poorest parts of New York City. This particular afternoon she witnesses a meeting held by "Old Padgett," a reformed drunk and lifelong resident of New York's "slums." In this meeting, the men of the neighborhood take turns sharing their triumphs over alcohol, gambling and other vices. Campbell's articles published in Sunday Afternoon magazine were later collected, along with those from Lippincott's Magazine, in a book titled "The Problem of the Poor" (1888).
Syndicate content