"Establishing constitutional malice for defamation and privacy/false light claims when hidden cameras and deception are used by the newsgatherer" - David A. Elder, Neville L. Johnson and Brian A. Rishwain - Loyola of Los Angeles Entertainment Law Review

"Establishing constitutional malice for defamation and privacy/false light claims when hidden cameras and deception are used by the newsgatherer" - David A. Elder, Neville L. Johnson and Brian A. Rishwain - Loyola of Los Angeles Entertainment Law Review

by: David A. Elder, Neville L. Johnson, Brian A. Rishwain | publication date: April 15, 2002 | Publication: Loyola of Los Angeles Entertainment Law Review | volume: 22:327 | pages: pp. 327-441

". . .A hidden camera story is essentially a 'grainy little morality play,' edited to heighten the entertainment value, where journalists go undercover to mythologize their work by becoming protagonists, modern, 'folk heroes' who ferret out wrongdoing as the superheroes of pop culture. . ."

David A. Elder, Neville L. Johnson and Brian A. Rishwain discuss the domination of the use of hidden cameras in network television news magazines. See footnote p336.

Copyrighted, used with permission from the Loyola of Los Angeles Entertainment Law Review.