tramps

Ted Conover
As a senior at Amherst college, Conover rode freight trains in the guise of a tramp for his senior thesis in anthropology. This piece for the Amherst alumni magazine is based on that research, describing a morning spent with "Pops," a 61-year-old man Conover lived with for a week.
Josiah Flynt
Here, Flynt talks about the large number of adolescent boys that adopt tramp-life.
Josiah Flynt
Flynt writes about the "railroad life" led by tramps and robbers. He points out that this is a uniquely American phenomenon, and nowhere in Europe has he witnessed such a close relationship between vagrancy and railroads.
A Specialist in the Evolution of the Tramp
Josiah Flynt
Josiah Flynt analyzes a certain strata of hobo society that is called "Gay Cats," which he describes as young men who although they know certain trades, choose to find only sporadic jobs or none at all. Flynt considers these precursors to the homeless tramp or vagabond that he discusses in the majority of his writings.
Their Wails of Woe Must Often Be Veritable Works of Arts
Josiah Flynt
In this special report to the Los Angeles Times, Flynt reveals different strategies tramps employ while begging for food and shelter.
The American Tramp Considered Geographically
Josiah Flynt
In this article, Josiah Flynt compares and contrasts the tramp culture's different regions of North America: "the North," "the East," "the West," and "the South."
Josiah Flynt
This article by Flynt concentrates on a tramp's primary means of transportation: the railroads. Flynt gives an account of a conversation he had with a railroad executive about the tramp problem. He also goes into detail about the centrality of rail-riding in a tramp's day-to-day life.
Josiah Flynt
In this account, Flynt describes in detail the week he spent tramping around upstate New York. While many of Flynt's writings mix sociology and pure description, this account consists entirely of the latter.
Josiah Flynt
In this lengthy article, Flynt describes the diverse and varied ecology of tramping in urban areas. He explains that just like other strata of society, tramps too must differentiate themselves by their methods and locations.
Conclusions from Personal Experience as an Amateur Tramp
Josiah Flynt
Half literary and half sociological, in this article Flynt describes the different ways in which men and boys enter into the tramping lifestyle. Flynt identifies jails and reform schools as common recruiting grounds for tramps.
Josiah Flynt
Flynt writes about the hierarchy and structure within the homeless or "tramp" community in the late nineteenth century. In this article, he gives detailed accounts of what he calls "clubs" or groups of homeless, from different parts of the country, and how they interact.
Syndicate content