Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle"

Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle"

Author: 
Upton Sinclair

Upton Sinclair's seminal novel about a family of Lithuanian immigrants struggling to survive immigrant family struggling to survive in Packingtown, the center of Chicago's meatpacking industry. Sinclair did not go undercover to work as a meatpacker. His sole deception was to carry a dinner pail as he made his way through the packinghouses, escorted by workers, so that he looked like he belonged.

Book Excerpt: 
There is over a square mile of space in the yards, and more than half of it is occupied by cattle-pens; north and south as far as the eye can reach there stretches a sea of pens. And they were all filled — so many cattle no one had ever dreamed existed in the world. Red cattle, black, white, and yellow cattle; old cattle and young cattle; great bellowing bulls and little calves not an hour born; meekeyed milch cows and fierce, long-horned Texas steers. The sound of them here was as of all the barnyards of the universe ; and as for counting them — it would have taken all day simply to count the pens. Here and there ran long alleys, blocked at intervals by gates; and Jokubas told them that the number of these gates was twenty-five thousand. Jokubas had recently been reading a newspaper article which was full of statistics such as that, and he was very proud as he repeated them and made his guests cry out with wonder. Jurgis too had a little of this sense of pride. Had he not just gotten a job, and become a sharer in all this activity, a cog in this marvellous machine.
Year of Publication: 
Mon, 1906-01-01
Rights Information: 
Doubleday, Page & Co.
City of Publication: 
New York