XXVIII-"The Jungle: A Story of Chicago" - Upton Sinclair - Appeal to Reason

XXVIII-"The Jungle: A Story of Chicago" - Upton Sinclair - Appeal to Reason

by: Upton Sinclair | publication date: October 28, 1905 | Publication: Appeal to Reason | journal issue: No. 517 | pages: 2

"The sanitary arrangements in the packing-houses had always been grossly inadequate; and now the corners of every room where meat was being prepared were reeking with the stench of human filth. The mayor was boasting that he put an end to gambling and prize-fighting in the city; while here a swarm of professional gamblers had leagued themselves with the police to fleece the strike-breakers; and any night, in the big open space in front of Smith's, one might see brawny negroes stripped to the waist and pounding each other for money, under the eyes of policemen, while a howling throng of three or four thousand surged about, men and women, young white girls from the country rubbing elbows with big buck negroes with daggers in their boots, while rows of woolly heads peered down from every window of the surrounding factories."

Chapter Twenty-eight in Upton Sinclair's original serial for Appeal to Reason, the unexpurgated version of what became "The Jungle."

public domain