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Guide to the Vincenzo Beltrone Collection
1924-2017
 MS 3029

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
New York, NY 10024
(212) 873-3400


New-York Historical Society

Collection processed by Joseph Ditta, June 2017

This finding aid was produced using ArchivesSpace on November 30, 2018 using Describing Archives: A Content Standard

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Beltrone, Vincenzo
Title: Vincenzo Beltrone collection
Dates [inclusive]: 1924-2017 (bulk, 1942-1950)
Abstract: Correspondence, poetry, and prose in English and Italian, by and relating to Italian-immigrant artist and writer Vincenzo Beltrone (1895–1950), a founding member of the Raven Poetry Circle of Greenwich Village. Beltrone's suspected pro-Fascist activities and editorials led to his investigation and arrest by the FBI in December 1941, and his internment as an alien enemy of the United States for nearly the duration of World War II. The collection includes a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) copy of Beltrone's FBI file, typescripts of virtually all his poetry, published matter by associates, and two small printing plate portraits.
Quantity: 2.919 Linear Feet (7 boxes)
Call Phrase: MS 3029

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Biographical/Historical Note

Throughout his work and correspondence the artist and poet Vincenzo Nicola Ostilio Beltrone (1895–1950) signed his name multiple ways: Vincenzo N. O. Beltrone, Vincenzo di Beltrone, Vincent Beltrone, and even "N. O. Belzo." This finding aid refers to him by the name he used most frequently—Vincenzo Beltrone—or, simply, Beltrone, but all the variants above (and possibly others) appear on documents throughout the collection.

Similarly, Beltrone's second wife and widow was known variously as Kate Felicita Fabian, Kate (or Kay) Fabian, Kate Beltrone, and Kate Fabian Beltrone. This finding aid uses the latter.

Vincenzo Beltrone was born on 7 August 1895 at Stignano, Calabria, Italy, to Giuseppe and Ildebranda (Cortesi) Beltrone. When he was twelve years old he emigrated to America, arriving at the Port of New York aboard the S.S. Sannio on 26 September 1907. He attended P.S. 7, on Chrystie Street, Manhattan, and later claimed to have graduated from DeWitt Clinton High School in 1914.

On 5 June 1917 Beltrone registered for the World War I draft, listing his occupation as artist. He entered the U.S. Army on 25 October 1918, serving briefly in the Coast Artillery at Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn. He was honorably discharged for a physical disability on 15 November.
In December 1923 he made the first of two trips back to Italy to see family (his parents and siblings did not remain permanently in America). A certified copy of his birth certificate in the collection (see box 4, folder 4) dates from this visit. He returned to New York aboard the  S.S. Duilio on 21 October 1924.

At some point Beltrone began writing poetry, but an explosion and fire at his studio (then at 31 West 16th Street) destroyed all the work he had composed by 1 August 1927. He rebounded quickly, though, since he had verse to read at "Poets' Soiree" in Greenwich Village on the 25th. Also that year, Beltrone was supposedly named "Poet of the New York City School System." He became closely associated with Francis Lambert McCrudden (1872–1958), founder of the Raven Poetry Circle of Greenwich Village, whose members displayed and sold their works along a fence on Washington Square, charging prices like fifteen cents a poem. The Ravens adopted as their motto Beltrone's line: "Ink is the silent partner of remembrance."

On 6 May 1930 Beltrone married Mary Venezia D'Amato, whom he would divorce on 24 June 1935. In November of that year, he returned for the second time to Italy. Ostensibly he made the trip to settle his late father's estate, but once there was conscripted to serve—or possibly volunteered—in Mussolini's army during the Italo-Ethopian War. (His politics were widely known: on 18 June 1934 the New York Times labeled him an "artist, poet and Fascist editor.") Beltrone was stationed in Somaliland between December 1935 and September 1936. A small broadside from this time—"Ai Legionari dei Fasci Italiani all'Estero" ("To the Legions of Italian Fascists Abroad")—sends the praises of Rome to the victorious forces in Ogaden and Dire Dawa, Ethiopia (see box 4, folder 4).

Once back in New York—he returned on 1 April 1937 aboard the S.S. Conte di Savoia—Beltrone worked as an information-desk guard for the Italian Pavilion of the 1939 New York World's Fair. He began the process of naturalization, but his Italian military service and later editorials for the pro-fascist newspaper,  Il Grido della Stirpe ("The Cry of the Race"; see box 5, folder 2 for examples), ended his chances of becoming an American citizen.

On 8 December 1941, Edward J. Ennis, chief counsel for the Immigration and Naturalization Service, convinced President Roosevelt to extend to Italians the regulations then in place against Japanese aliens, who were being arrested as possible enemies of state. Beltrone was among the first Italians the FBI apprehended that very day "because of the belief that his continued freedom of movement was dangerous to the United States." (Domenico Trombetta, publisher of Il Grido della Stirpe, was also arrested and indicted as a foreign agent.)

Beltrone was interned for nearly the duration of World War II, at multiple locations. The dates he stayed at each facility (below) are drawn from his correspondence (see boxes 1–3):

  1. Ellis Island (1st time): December 1941–January 1942
  2. Camp McAlester, Oklahoma (1st time): January–March 1942
  3. Ellis Island (2nd time): March 1942
  4. Camp Upton, New York: March 1942
  5. Fort George G. Meade, Maryland: March–September 1942
  6. Camp McAlester, Oklahoma (2nd time): September 1942–May[?] 1943
  7. Fort Missoula, Montana: May[?] 1943–March 1944
  8. Ellis Island (3rd time): March 1944–May 1945

At Camp McAlester Beltrone painted murals for the Officer's Hall—"Conquest of the West" and "Indian Life"—and decorated the post chapel with religious scenes.

He was paroled in May 1945, and soon after married Kate Felicita Fabian (1903–1969), a fellow member of the Raven Poetry Circle and his most frequent correspondent during his long internment.

Beltrone died on 26 January 1950, aged fifty-four. Until her death fourteen years later, Kate worked toward compiling an omnibus edition of her husband's work, drawn from his sole known published volume,  Eroica and Other Poems (New York: S. F. Vanni, 1940), as well as unpublished material, some of it composed during internment. The project never materialized, apparently, but much of Beltrone's writing survives in this collection (see boxes 5 and 6).

[This biographical note is drawn from Roslyn Bernstein's article, "Alien Enemy M68-279: The Unresolved Case of Vincenzo Beltrone" (see box 4, folder 8), from New York Times items concerning Beltrone (2 and 26 August 1927; 18 June 1934), from documents in his WWII Alien Enemy Detention and Internment Case File (see box 4, folders 5-7), and from his obituary in the  Raven Anthology no. 84 (April 1950).]

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Scope and Contents

The correspondence in the Vincenzo Beltrone Collection spans 1924–1968, but at its core are the letters exchanged between Beltrone and his fiancée (later wife), Kate Felicita Fabian (1903–1969), during his internment as an alien enemy of the United States, 1941–1945. Beltrone and Fabian each wrote often—sometimes more than once per day—to and from the locations of his internment, which changed with dizzying frequency (see the Biographical/Historical Note for places and dates). The letters describe conditions in the camps, Beltrone's health, and endless efforts to clear his name. A number of the letters have been razored or redacted by government censors.

Some correspondence is with Edward J. Ennis (1908–1990), director of the alien enemy control unit of the Department of Justice, and Howard F. Corcoran (1906–1989), U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York.

A few letters are from Beltrone's fellow detainees on Ellis Island, congratulating him on his release. One, from a woman named Gloria McCleod (postmarked 19 June 1945), describes her attempted suicide: "I am sincerly sorry I had to let you see such an unpleasant sight as it must of been to see me jump from the balcony." Another frequent correspondent in the collection is Raven Poetry Circle founder Francis Lambert McCrudden. (See Series I.)

While researching her article "Alien Enemy M68-279: The Unresolved Case of Vincenzo Beltrone," published in the May/June 1987 issue of Attenzione, Roslyn Bernstein (donor of this collection) requested and received by the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) a copy of Beltrone's WWII Alien Enemy Detention and Internment Case File from the U.S. Department of Justice. It contains correspondence, questionnaires, affidavits, and other documents dating between 1940 and 1947 that tell the complete story of Beltrone's arrest, internment, and eventual release. (See Series II.)

The collection includes typescript and manuscript versions of virtually all Beltrone's poetry and some of his prose, in Italian and English. He was an active member of the Raven Poetry Circle of Greenwich Village, and some sheets show evidence of having been thumbtacked for display and sale at Raven shows on Washington Square. After her husband's death, Kate Fabian Beltrone worked to assemble an omnibus edition of his writing called Poetic Letters. This never materialized, apparently, but the projected book was to include 293 poems, some drawn from his only known published volume,  Eroica and Other Poems (New York: S. F. Vanni, 1940). The drafts for a number of these sections survive in the collection, but it is unclear at what stage Kate left the project on her death in 1969. There are also photocopies of pages from journals Beltrone kept while serving as a private in the signal corps of the Italian army in Somaliland, 1935–1936, and copies of some of the pro-Fascist editorials he wrote for the newspaper  Il Grido della Stirpe, or "The Cry of the Race." (See Series III.)

A mix of published material—mostly poetry books (some in Italian) and poetry journals—that belonged to Vincenzo Beltrone and his widow, rounds out the collection. Kate Fabian Beltrone, a poet herself, was a contributing editor to PEGASUS: The Poetry Quarterly, in which she published her late husband's verse along with her own. A few scattered issues are in box 7, folder 2. The collection also includes two small woodblock printing plate portraits of Beltrone, one of which is reproduced in the 1987 version of Roslyn Bernstein's article, "Alien Enemy M68-279: The Unresolved Case of Vincenzo Beltrone." (See Series IV.)

Arrangement

The collection is organized in four series:

Series I. Correspondence, 1924–1968 (bulk, 1942-1945)

Series II. Series II. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) documents and Bernstein research, 1940–2017 (bulk, 1940-1947)

Series III. Writings, 1930s–ca. 1950

Series IV. Print matter, 1933–1959

Material is generally ordered chronologically, with some exceptions clarified at the series level.

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Access Points

Subject Names

  • McCrudden, Francis Lambert, 1872-1958
  • Beltrone, Kate Fabian
  • Beltrone, Vincenzo
  • Ennis, Edward J
  • Corcoran, Howard F.

Subject Organizations

  • Raven Poetry Circle of Greenwich Village

Subject Topics

  • Italian Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942.
  • World War, 1939-1945 -- Italian Americans.
  • Fascism -- United States -- History -- 20th century
  • Italo-Ethiopian War, 1935-1936
  • Poets, American -- New York (State) -- New York

Subject Places

  • Camp Upton (N.Y.)
  • Fort George G. Meade (Md.)
  • McAlester Internment Camp (Okla.)
  • Fort Missoula (Mont.)
  • Greenwich Village (New York, N.Y.)
  • Ellis Island Immigration Station (N.Y. and N.J.)

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Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Open to qualified researchers.

Photocopying undertaken by staff only. Limited to twenty exposures of stable, unbound material per day. (Researchers may not accrue unused copy amounts from previous days.)

Use Restrictions

This collection is owned by the New-York Historical Society. The copyright law of the United States governs the making of photocopies and protects unpublished materials as well as published materials. Unpublished materials created before 1 January 1978 cannot be quoted in publication without permission of the copyright holder.

Preferred Citation

This collection should be cited as the Vincenzo Beltrone Collection, MS 3029, New-York Historical Society.

Related Archival Materials

 At the New-York Historical Society:
Photographs of Vincenzo Beltrone are found in the Raven Poetry Circle of Greenwich Village collection [graphic], ca. 1933-ca. 1954 (box 1; box 2, folders 1, 3, 4, and 5; box 3, folders 8, 14, and 15), and in the Raven Poetry Circle of Greenwich Village papers, ca. 1930s-2000s (folder 4). The latter collection has a copy of Raven founder Francis Lambert McCrudden's book,  Harp of the Minettas (1938), for which Beltrone wrote the preface. The collection also includes a bound run of the  Raven Anthology from December 1933 (no. 1) through October 1940 (no. 61), which carried poetry by Beltrone in many issues. A single issue of the  Raven Anthology from April 1950 (no. 84), with McCrudden's obituary for Beltrone (who died 26 January 1950), is filed in the printed collections under PS580 .R38.
 At the Center for Migration Studies (CMS):
Beltrone published at least one book,  Eroica and Other Poems (New York: S. F. Vanni, 1940). The only publicly-held copy appears to be that in the Italian American Writers Collection (CMS.016) at CMS. The collection includes an undated manuscript for Beltrone's  "Articoli e Ritagli. Poesia. Prosa." ["Articles and Scraps. Poetry. Prose."]

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Gift of Roslyn Bernstein in honor of Frank Fabian, 2017.

Processing Information

Processed by archivist Joseph Ditta, June 2017. Mansucript collection number corrected (from MS2039 to MS3029), November 2018.

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Container List

Series I. Correspondence, 1924-1968 (bulk, 1942-1945). 1.46 Linear Feet (3.5 boxes)

Scope and Contents

Series I consists largely of the correspondence exchanged between Beltrone and his fiancée (later wife), Kate Felicita Fabian (1903–1969), during his internment as an alien enemy of the United States, 1941–1945. Beltrone and Fabian each wrote often—sometimes more than once per day—to and from the locations of his internment. Their letters describe conditions in the camps, Beltrone's health, and attempts to clear his name. A number of the letters have been razored or redacted by government censors.

Some correspondence is with Edward J. Ennis (1908–1990), director of the alien enemy control unit of the Department of Justice, and Howard F. Corcoran (1906–1989), U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York.

A few letters are from Beltrone's fellow detainees on Ellis Island, congratulating him on his release. One, from a woman named Gloria McCleod (postmarked 19 June 1945), describes her attempted suicide: "I am sincerly sorry I had to let you see such an unpleasant sight as it must of been to see me jump from the balcony." Another frequent correspondent in the series is Raven Poetry Circle founder Francis Lambert McCrudden, whose letters are noted in the container list below.

Arrangement

The letters in Series I are in chronological order (box 1 through box 4, folder 2), with undated correspondence following (box 4, folder 3). One folder of miscellaneous documents, ephemera, and photographs completes the series (box 4, folder 4).

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 1 Folder : 1 Correspondence
1928 March 10-1940 September 21
Box: 1 Folder : 2 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letters, 7 and 13 January 1942.

1940 October 1-1942 January 13
Box: 1 Folder : 3 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letters, 26-27 January; 1 and 14 February 1942.

1942 January 20-February 23
Box: 1 Folder : 4 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letter, 23 March 1942.

1942 March 2-April 27
Box: 1 Folder : 5 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letter, 13 May 1942.

1942 April 28-June 1
Box: 1 Folder : 6 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letters, 26 June and 30 July 1942 (the latter on Raven Anthology letterhead).

1942 June 2-July 31
Box: 1 Folder : 7 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letter, 25 August 1942.

1942 August 3-October 20
Box: 1 Folder : 8 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letters, 4–5 November 1942.

1942 October 27-December 22
Box: 2 Folder : 1 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letter, 2 May 1943.

1943 January 6-June 15
Box: 2 Folder : 2 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letters, 6 and 27 July 1943.

1943 June 18-July 27
Box: 2 Folder : 3 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letters, 2 and 25 August 1943.

1943 July 28-September 30
Box: 2 Folder : 4 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letters, 31 October and 26 November 1943.

1943 October 4-November 26
Box: 2 Folder : 5 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes a detailed Beltrone family tree, 29 January 1944.

1943 November 27-1944 January 29
Box: 2 Folder : 6 Correspondence
1944 February 1-March 25
Box: 2 Folder : 7 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letter, 8 May 1944.

1944 March 27-May 15
Box: 3 Folder : 1 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letter, 16 June 1944.

1944 May 21-July 10
Box: 3 Folder : 2 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letters, 22 July and 4 September 1944.

1944 July 16-September 4
Box: 3 Folder : 3 Correspondence
1944 September 10-November 11
Box: 3 Folder : 4 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letter, 29 November 1944.

1944 November 14-December 30
Box: 3 Folder : 5 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes McCrudden letters, 9 and 25 April 1945.

1945 January 13-December 23
Box: 4 Folder : 1 Correspondence
1946 February 19-1949 January 19
Box: 4 Folder : 2 Correspondence
1950 January 13-1968 June 19
Box: 4 Folder : 3 Correspondence

Scope and Contents

Includes ribbons that bundled some of the correspondence.

n.d.
Box: 4 Folder : 4 Documents, ephemera, photographs

Scope and Contents

Contains:

1. A certified copy (1924) of Beltrone's 1895 birth certificate from Stignano, Italy.
2. A document that appears to be a visa from Beltrone's first return to Italy (1924).
3. A "Compagnie di Navigazione Italiane" steamship line information sheet.
4. A certificate of baptism for Beltrone's first wife, Mary Venezia D'amato, issued at the time of their marriage (1930).
5. His father Giuseppe's Italian passport (1931).
6. Three unidentified photographs, one stamped (on verso) "Lubliner, Photographer, 314 E. Houston St., New York."
7. Two small Italian-language broadsides, one—"Miserabile Mandolinista" (1930)—promoting (or disparaging?) Italian Communist Party leader Palmiro Togliatti (1893–1964), the other—"Ai Legionari dei Fasci Italiani all'Estero" (ca. 1936)—congratulating Italian Fascists abroad on their victories in Ogaden and Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.

1924-1936

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Series II. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) documents and Roslyn Bernstein research, 1940-2017 (bulk, 1940-1947). 0.208 Linear Feet (0.5 boxes)

Scope and Contents

While researching her article "Alien Enemy M68-279: The Unresolved Case of Vincenzo Beltrone," published in the May/June 1987 issue of Attenzione, Roslyn Bernstein (donor of this collection) requested and received by the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) a copy of Beltrone's WWII Alien Enemy Detention and Internment Case File from the U.S. Department of Justice. It contains correspondence, questionnaires, affidavits, and other documents dating between 1940 and 1947.

Series II also includes both iterations of Bernstein's published article (1987 and 2017), as well as a 1984 letter to her (in Italian) from one Antonino Muzzí, regarding Beltrone's life and family in Italy (see box 4, folder 8).

The researcher should consult the complete FOIA documents in conjunction with Bernstein's article to best understand the timeline of Beltrone's arrest, internment, and eventual release.

Arrangement

The original sequence of the FOIA documents in Series II is unclear, but it may have been reverse chronological order, i.e., 1947 back through 1940. While all of the documents are photocopies, some appear to be copies of copies, since their group numbers (handwritten in marker) are partially cut off. Bernstein renumbered (in red ink) the documents in box 4, folder 6, which remain in that order. Those in box 4, folder 7 remain in the order in which they were hole-punched together.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 4 Folder : 5-7 FOIA documents (3 folders)
1940-1947
Box: 4 Folder : 8 Roslyn Bernstein research

Scope and Contents

Contains three items:

1. A letter, in Italian, dated 14 November 1984, from Antonino Muzzí to Roslyn Bernstein, on Beltrone's family background in Stignano, Italy.
2. Roslyn Bernstein, "Alien Enemy M68-279: The Unresolved Case of Vincenzo Beltrone,"  Attenzione, May/June 1987 [photocopy].
3. Roslyn Bernstein, "Alien Enemy M68-279: The Unresolved Case of Vincenzo Beltrone,"  Italian Americana, vol. 35, no. 1 (Winter 2017) [journal contributed by Joseph Ditta].

1984-2017

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Series III. Writings, 1930s-ca. 1950. 0.834 Linear Feet (2 boxes)

Scope and Contents

Series III includes typescript and manuscript versions of virtually all Beltrone's poetry and some of his prose, in Italian and English. He was an active member of the Raven Poetry Circle of Greenwich Village, and some sheets show evidence of having been thumbtacked for display and sale at Raven shows on Washington Square.

After her husband's death, Kate Fabian Beltrone worked to assemble an omnibus edition of his writing called Poetic Letters. This never materialized, apparently, but the projected volume was to include 293 poems—some drawn from his only known published book,  Eroica and Other Poems (New York: S. F. Vanni, 1940)—grouped in the five sections below (which are detailed in a prospectus in box 5, folder 7):

1. Poetic Letters (36 poems)
2. This Pilgrimage (70 poems)
3. Appassionata (68 poems)
4. Selections from  Eroica and Other Poems (29 poems)
5. General Poems (90 poems)

The drafts for a number of these sections survive in the current collection (see, for instance, box 5, folders 6-8), but Kate Fabian Beltrone reused binders, crossing out titles and inserting new ones (see, for instance, box 5, folder 10, where the title "Appassionata" has been replaced by "Variations on a Theme"), so it is unclear at what stage she left the project on her death in 1969. A few of her own poems and lyrics are found in box 6, folder 1.

Arrangement

The few dated items in Series III are arranged chronologically (box 5, folders 1-5). Undated poetry and prose follows (box 5, folder 6, through box 6, folder 9). Folder titles appear as written. Titles in brackets were supplied by the archivist. No attempt has been made to collate multiple copies/versions of poems scattered throughout Series III.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 5 Folder : 1 Notebooks

Scope and Contents

Photocopies of manuscript journals Beltrone kept while serving in the Italian military in Somaliland. Location of originals unknown.

[1935-1936]
Box: 5 Folder : 2 Newspaper editorials

Scope and Contents

Microfilm printouts of seven editorials (of many) Beltrone wrote for the English section of Il Grido della Stirpe [The Cry of the Race], a pro-Fascist Italian-language newspaper published in New York. The printouts do not include the year of publication, only the month and day (handwritten in ink), but these pieces are all presumably from the late 1930s through 1941. In the list below, those articles with a full date are excerpted in an FBI document in Beltrone's WWII Alien Enemy Detention and Internment Case File (see box 4, folder 7). Other editorials are excerpted there as well.

1. "The Heroic End of the Graf Spee," 6 January 1940.
2. "British Violations on the High Seas," 2 March 1940.
3. "Political Tremors Among the Allies," 13 April 1940 (2 copies).
4. "All Quiet on the Western Front," 11 February [unknown year].
5. "Russia's Straggling Army," 18 February [unknown year].
6. "Victories on Paper," 27 April [unknown year].
7. "When the Guns Will Speak in the Mediterranean," 4 May [unknown year].

1930s-1941
Box: 5 Folder : 3-4 [Poetry] (2 folders)

Scope and Contents

Typescript poems from a binder marked "Typed Copy 1945 / 1939-41," some with handwritten annotations and drawings. The thumbtack holes in at least two sheets—the poems "Hotel Lobby" and "Skyscraper"—as well as the handwritten price (15-cents) indicate they were likely displayed and offered for sale at Raven Poetry Circle gatherings on Washington Square.

1939-1941
Box: 5 Folder : 5 [Poetry]

Scope and Contents

Typescript poems.

1945-1946
Box: 5 Folder : 6 Poetic Letters

Scope and Contents

Table of contents headed "Poetic Letters / Vignettes (MSS 3) / By Vincent Beltrone."

n.d.
Box: 5 Folder : 7 Poetic Letters (Originals)

Scope and Contents

Annotated typescript of the preceding folder. From a binder marked "(Poetic letters) Originals."

n.d.
Box: 5 Folder : 8 Fragments & Poetic Letters

Scope and Contents

Manuscript and typescript poems from a binder marked "poems to be read again."

n.d.
Box: 5 Folder : 9 Poems by Vincent Beltrone

Scope and Contents

Typescript poems with handwritten annotations.

n.d.
Box: 5 Folder : 10 Variations on a Theme

Scope and Contents

Typescript poems with handwritten annotations.

n.d.
Box: 5 Folder : 11 [Poetry]

Scope and Contents

Typescript poems from a binder marked "Poems of Romance" [crossed out] and "Poems to Kate" [crossed out].

n.d.
Box: 5 Folder : 12 Carbon copies

Scope and Contents

Typescript poems from a binder marked "Carbon Copies / General Poems [crossed out] / Vincenzo di Beltrone."

n.d.
Box: 5 Folder : 13-14 [Lola Montez] (2 folders)

Scope and Contents

The typescript poems in folders 13-14 were housed in the cardboard wrapper of a package of Nekoosa watermarked bond paper. One flap (preserved in box 5, folder 13) is marked "Lola Montez," but it is unclear if there is any connection between the nineteenth-century actress and Beltrone's text. His first poem in English—"Myself"—is in folder 13.

n.d.
Box: 6 Folder : 1-2 General Poems (2 folders)

Scope and Contents

Typescripts from a portfolio marked "General Poems." Includes material in Italian and some pieces by Kate Fabian Beltrone (box 6, folder 1). Box 6, folder 2 preserves the portfolio.

n.d.
Box: 6 Folder : 3-5 Italian Poetry (3 folders)

Scope and Contents

Manuscripts and typescripts from a portfolio marked "Italian Poetry." Box 6, folder 5 preserves the portfolio.

n.d.
Box: 6 Folder : 6 [Dramatic dialogue]

Scope and Contents

Manuscript dialogue between Scypio and Omnis, presumably by Vincenzo Beltrone. Written on verso of stationery from Health Brands Distributors, Liquid Garlic Products, 267 East 2nd Street, New York, NY.

n.d.
Box: 6 Folder : 7-8 The Attic Speaks (2 folders)

Scope and Contents

Manuscript and typescript prose sketches from an unfinished work called "The Attic Speaks: A Greenwich Village Diary," including "The Arch," "Nefretiti" [sic], "The Suicide," and "Two Village Ladies."

n.d.
Box: 6 Folder : 9 [Prose sketches]

Scope and Contents

Additional sketches that possibly belong to "The Attic Speaks," including "Madame le Baroness," "The Maestro," "Moses in New York," "My Friend Valdo / The Mad Monk," "Papa Greenberg / The Eccentric Landlord."

n.d.

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Series IV. Print matter, 1933-1959. 0.417 Linear Feet (1 box)

Scope and Contents

Series IV contains a mix of published material—mostly poetry books (some in Italian) and poetry journals—that belonged to Vincenzo Beltrone and his widow, the poet Kate Fabian Beltrone. Vincenzo died early in 1950, so anything dating from before then could conceivably have been his.

Kate was a contributing editor to PEGASUS: The Poetry Quarterly, in which she published her late husband's verse along with her own. A few scattered issues are in box 7, folder 2.

Series IV also includes two small woodblock printing plate portraits of Beltrone, one of which is reproduced in the 1987 version of Roslyn Bernstein's article, "Alien Enemy M68-279: The Unresolved Case of Vincenzo Beltrone" (box 4, folder 8).

Arrangement

The material in Series IV is separated by format and ordered chronologically within each folder.

Container 1 Container 2   Title Date
Box: 6 Folder : 10 Italian poetry and "letterature"

Scope and Contents

Contains four items:

1. Vincenzo De Simone, La Funtana: Sonetti Siciliani (Milano: Edizione "Siculorum Gymnasium," 1933). Inscribed by the author to Vincenzo Beltrone.
2. Giuseppe Tusiani,  Flora, O Primi Fiori di Poesia [poems] (n.p., ca. 1949). Inscribed by the author to Vincenzo Beltrone, 24 January 1949.
3. Matteo Teresi,  Ai Giovani Figli D'Italia (Rochester, N.Y.: Florence Printing and Publishing, n.d.).
4. G. B. Angioletti and G. Antonini,  Panorama of the Contemporary Italian Letterature (Florence: Vallecchi Publisher, n.d.).

1933-ca. 1949
Box: 7 Folder : 1 Poetry journals and dramatic works

Scope and Contents

Contains five items:

1. George F. Meyers, Astral Broadcasting Networks: The Sorrows of Lilith in her Adventure with Wotan. A Play in Three Acts—With a Prologue ([New York]: published by the author, 1937). Inscribed by the author to V. Beltrone.
2.  Crescendo [poetry journal], vol. 3 (Autumn 1944). Final issue; merged with Iconograph.
3.  Section Eight [poetry leaflet] (1955).
4.  Talisman 7 [literary journal] (Summer 1955).
5.  Flame [literary journal], vol. 6, no. 3 (Autumn 1959).

1937-1959
Box: 7 Folder : 2 PEGASUS: The Poetry Quarterly.

Scope and Contents

Five issues of PEGASUS: The Poetry Quarterly (originally called  PEGASUS: The Poetry Quarterly of Greenwich Village), which ran from 1952 to 1960.

Kate Fabian Beltrone is listed as financial secretary in the PEGASUS issues from 1953 and 1954. In subsequent issues she is a member of the editorial board.

1. Vol. 2, no. 4 (Fall 1953)
2. Vol. 3, no. 1 (Spring 1954); includes Beltrone's "Fantasia" and Kate Fabian Beltrone's "Tranquility."
3. Issue XII, vol. 3, no. 4 (1955); includes Beltrone's "The Blue Mask" and Kate Fabian Beltrone's "Sunlight on a Tear."
4. Issue XV, vol. 4, no. 3 (1956); includes Beltrone's "Chanzon Triste" and Kate Fabian Beltrone's "The Spinning Disc."
5. Issue XVIII, vol. 5, no. 2 (1958); includes Beltrone's "Poem to a Dreamer" and Kate Fabian Beltrone's "Washington Square."

1953-1958
Box: 7 Folder : 3 Poetry books

Scope and Contents

Contains three items:

1. Francis J. Mathues, Bestiary (New York: William-Frederick Press, 1953); illustrated by Alan Thielker.
2. Harland Ristau,  Slum School (Shelbyville, Ind.: Blue River Press, 1954).
3. Dixie Allen,  Idle Thoughts in Poems (New York: Pageant Press, Inc., 1957).

1953-1957
Box: 7 Folder : 4-5 [The Heart in Song] (2 folders)

Scope and Contents

Tearsheets of "The Heart in Song" poetry column from the dual-language periodical Il Messaggero [The Messenger], published by the Italian Mission Endowment Fund, Inc., Kansas City, Missouri. The top sheet posthumously profiles Beltrone's life and work, with selections from his poetry. Box 7, folder 5 preserves the portfolio that held these sheets.

n.d.
Box: 7 Folder : 6 Printing plates

Scope and Contents

Two small printing plate portraits of Vincenzo Beltrone mounted on woodblocks, one of which is reproduced in the 1987 version of Roslyn Bernstein's article, "Alien Enemy M68-279: The Unresolved Case of Vincenzo Beltrone" (box 4, folder 8).

n.d.

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